Tag Archives: southern university

HBCU Money™ Presents: 2018’s HBCU Alumni NFL Players’ & Salaries


In our 5th annual installment of tracking the earnings of HBCU alumni who are NFL players, the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff’s Terron Armstead takes the crown.

HBCU Money™ FACTS:

  • HBCU NFL players combine for $38.7 million, an almost 32 percent decline from our last list in 2016, when HBCU NFL players earned $56.4 million.
  • South Carolina State University leads the way with 4 NFL players.
  • 16 HBCUs are represented in the NFL. Up from 15 in 2016.
  • Average salary for HBCU NFL players is $1.8 million, a sharp decrease from $2.1 million in 2016.
  • Median salary for HBCU NFL players is $630,000, down 35 percent from 2016.
  • HBCU players account for 1.3 percent of the NFL’s 32 team active roster spots.
  1. Terron Armstead /University Arkansas-Pine Bluff / Saints / $10.3 million
  2. Antoine Bethea / Howard University / Cardinals / $4.48 million
  3. William Hayes / Winston-Salem State University / Dolphins / $4.05 million
  4. Isaiah Crowell / Alabama State University / Jets / $4 million
  5. Rafael Bush / South Carolina State University / Bills / $2 million
  6. Joe Thomas / South Carolina Sate University / Cowboys / $1.575 million
  7. Brandon Parker / North Carolina A&T State Univ. / Raiders / $1.538 million
  8. Anthony Levine / Tennessee State University / Ravens / $1.4 million
  9. Rodney Gunter / Delaware State University / Cardinals / $705,000
  10. Javon Hargrave / South Carolina State Univ. / Steelers / $691,000
  11. Antonio Hamilton / South Carolina State University / Giants / $630,000 (Tied)
  12. Chester Rogers / Grambling State University / Colts / $630,000 (Tied)
  13. Ryan Smith / North Carolina Central University / Buccaneers / $630,000 (Tied)
  14. Trenton Cannon / Virginia State University / Jets / $619,224
  15. Chad Williams / Grambling State University / Cardinals / $581,500
  16. Tarik Cohen / North Carolina A&T State Univ. / Bears / $555,000 (Tied)
  17. Tony McRae / North Carolina A&T State Univ. / Bengals / $555,000 (Tied)
  18. Michael Ola / Hampton University / Saints / $511,181
  19. Danny Johnson / Southern University / Redskins / $490,000
  20. Trent Scott / Grambling State University / Chargers / $451,674
  21. KhaDarel Hodge / Prairie View A&M University / Rams / $423,529
  22. Jawill Davis / Bethune-Cookman University / Giants / $395,294
Advertisements

HBCU Money™ Presents: 2016-2017’s Public HBCU Presidents By Salary/Compensation


HBCU Money’s second annual gathering of presidential salaries at the nation’s public HBCUs.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The highest paid public HBCU presidents’ list is dominated by the SWAC/MEAC who comprise 10 of the 11 highest paid presidents with the MEAC leading the way with six.
  • America’s top 5 paid public university presidents’ compensation ($10.3 million) is more than five times greater than the top 5 paid public HBCU university presidents’ ($2.05 million) on our list.
  • 1890 HBCUs, land-grant institutions, comprise 5 out of the 9 HBCUs present.

Ray Belton Southern Univ. System – $452,000

Austin Lane – Texas Southern University – $437,800

David Wilson Morgan State University – $432,754

Harold Martin North Carolina A&T State Univ. – $380,210

Larry Robinson* Florida A&M University – $347,344

Glenda Baskin-Glover Tennessee State Univ. – $321,596

Mickey Burnim Bowie State University – $318,664

James Clark South Carolina State Univ. – $230,000

Roderick Paige* Jackson State University – $170,387

Elmira Mangum* Florida A&M University – $107,471

Carolyn Meyers* Jackson State University – $90,166

*Partial-year compensation

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

Locked Out: HBCUs Only Receive 3 Of The 460 Donations Of $1 Million Plus To Colleges In 2017


If charity is any economic indicator, then wealthy donors have retrenched their nervousness about the economy as a whole. Two years ago, $1 million dollar plus donations to colleges and universities were under 500 such charitable gifts for the first time since 2012. Last year, that was reversed to almost 600, but the reversal was not to be sustained in 2017 where once again less than 500 donations – only 460 to be exact were of the $1 million dollar plus variety to colleges and universities. The largest donation made its way to UC-San Francisco to the tune of $500 million by the Hellen Miller Foundation whose source of wealth stems from real estate. For perspective, this donation is an amount equal to twenty-five percent of all HBCU endowments combined.

For HBCUs, the trend has been a constant struggle to get back to 2014 when nine such donations were made to our institutions. Since that time, not more than five have occurred in a given year in the past three years and this year marks the lowest number with only three donations of $1 million plus. That HBCUs can not even garner three percent (the number that HBCUs represent as a total of all American colleges and universities) marks a continued challenge in the financial arms race that is happening among higher education institutions as the shifting landscape of the 21st century unfolds. Without the transformative donations, HBCUs remain reliant on tuition revenue and at risk in competing for talent both among faculty, students, research, and infrastructure. What is the solution to this philanthropic Rubik Cube? As with most problems, there is more than one solution, but there is no doubt those solutions need to come fast and soon.

If you need perspective on just how large the gap is between the largest donations to HWCU/PWIs and HBCUs is – the top three PWI donations totaled $969 million. In contrast, HBCUs top three donations totaled $3.7 million, an amount that is 262 times less.

1. Orlando L. Clark (pictured above) – $1.59 Million
Recipient: Tuskegee University
Source of Wealth: Health care

2. Antonio Clayton – $1.1 Million
Recipient: Southern U. System Foundation
Source of Wealth: Law

3. George & Jill Hamilton – $1 Million                                                        Recipient: North Carolina Central University
Source of Wealth: Chemicals

Source: The Center for Philanthropy

 

HBCU Money™ Presents: The George W. Carver 2014’s Top 20 HBCU Research Institutions


gwcarverlabjpg-3550550efe9ad5fa

In an ode to the greatest HBCU scientist, we have now named our top HBCU research institution list for George Washington Carver.

HBCUs appear to have taken another step back in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2013, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $451.4 million, while 2014 combines for $445.4 million. This represents a 1.34 percent drop year over year and 2.13 percent drop from two years ago.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Florida A&M University at 199 and the twentieth ranked Alcorn State University is listed at 314 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC leads the way with eight schools versus the SWAC with four.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise two schools on the list.
  • Overall, the 1890 HBCUs are fifty percent of the list highlighting agriculture’s importance role in HBCU research.
  1. Florida A&M University – $41.37 million
  2. Morehouse School of Medicine – $41.86 million
  3. Howard University – $40.77 million
  4. North Carolina A&T State University – $35.05 million
  5. Alabama A&M University – $32.91 million
  6. Jackson State University – $$26.61 million
  7. Tuskegee University – $24.95 million
  8. Charles Drew University of Medicine – $20.69 million
  9. University of Virgin Islands – $20.37 million
  10. Tennessee State University – $20.07 million
  11. Meharry Medical College – $19.00 million
  12. Delaware State University – $17.68 million
  13. Morgan State University – $15.72 million
  14. Fayetteville State University – $14.73 million
  15. South Carolina State University – $13.15 million
  16. Prairie View A&M University – $12.29 million
  17. North Carolina Central University – $11.54 million
  18. Hampton University – $11.17 million
  19. Southern University and A&M College – $10.42 million
  20. Alcorn State University – $10.06 million

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $445.4 million ($451.4 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 52:1, an increase from 2013’s 50:1.

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $23.2 billion ($22.5 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $22.3 million

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $948 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $19.5 million

Source: National Science Foundation

Student Debt Profile By Conference (School By School) – The GCAC


GCAC-logo

Dillard University

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – $36 241

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – 96%

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – 18%

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 67%

Edward Waters College

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – N/A

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 83%

Fisk University

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – $27 345

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – 77%

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – 37%

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 59%

Philander Smith University

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – $35 000

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – 96%

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – 0%

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 76%

Southern University at New Orleans

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – N/A

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 83%

Talladega College

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – N/A

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 85%

Tougaloo College

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – N/A

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – N/A

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 77%

Xavier University of Louisiana

Average debt of graduates, 2011 – $26 106

Proportion of graduates with debt, 2011 – 83%

Nonfederal debt, % of total debt of graduates, 2011 – 25%

2010-11 Pell Grant recipients – 59%

Source: Project on Student Debt