Tag Archives: alabama a&m university

HBCU Money™ Presents: The George W. Carver 2017’s Top 20 HBCU Research Institutions


Dr. George Washington Carver (January 5, 1864-January 5, 1943) was an American scientist, botanist, educator, and inventor. Carver is best known for his research into alternative crops to cotton, such as peanuts, soybeans, and sweet potatoes. He wanted poor farmers to grow these alternative crops to aid in the nutrition of farm families and to provide another source of cash income to improve the farmer’s quality of life. Dr. Carver is shown at work at Tuskegee University in September 1938. Photo Courtesy National Archives and Records Administration. r

HBCUs continue to go backwards in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2015, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $425.7 million, while 2017 combines for $424.7 million. Over the past five years, HBCU research expenditures have dropped almost 4.7 percent or a loss of $20.7 million.

  • The top ranked HBCU, Howard University, ranked 203rd and the twentieth ranked HBCU, Virginia State University, ranked 325th among America’s college research landscape.
  • The MEAC maintains their dominance with eight schools versus the SWAC’s four.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise four schools on the list.
  • 1890 HBCUs, land-grant universities, dominate the top twenty with eleven of the top HBCU research universities.
  • All HBCUs combined account for $537.8 million in research expenditures. There are 45 PWI/HWCUs who have research budgets above this amount individually.

Rank. HBCU. Previous Year In Parentheses.

  1. Howard University – $45.8 million ($41.0 million)
  2. Florida A&M University – $37.6 million ($45.4 million)
  3. N.C. A&T State Univ. – $37.4 million ($33.8 million)
  4. Morehouse School of Medicine – $36.9 million ($38.8 million)
  5. Alabama A&M University – $31.7 million ($30.3 million)
  6. Jackson State University – $22.8 million ($23.8 million)
  7. Delaware State University – $20.8 million ($21.3 million)
  8. Tennessee State University – $18.1 million ($19.5 million)
  9. Meharry Medical College – $16.8 million ($14.8 million)
  10. Tuskegee University – $16.5 million ($16.5 million)
  11. Hampton University – $16.6 million ($14.2 million)
  12. Alcorn State University – $16.1 million ($8.2 million)
  13. Charles R. Drew University – $15.7 million ($13.4 million)
  14. Morgan State University – $15.0 million ($15.7 million)
  15. S.C. State University – $14.3 million ($13.1 million)
  16. N.C. Central University – $14.1 million ($12.5 million)
  17. Prairie View A&M University – $14.0 million ($12.6 million)
  18. Xavier University of LA. – $12.4 million ($12.1 million)
  19. Langston University – $11.5 million ($11.2 million)
  20. Virginia State University – $10.8 million ($8.1 million)

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $424.7 million ($425.7 million)

Additional Notes:

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is $53:1

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $22.7 billion ($23.2 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.2 billion

Top 20 Average HBCU – $21.2 million

Top 20 Median HWCU – $1.1 billion

Top 20 Median HBCU – $16.5 million

Source: National Science Foundation

Donate To Every School In The SWAC/MEAC Challenge


How many HBCUs have you donated money too? Below are the jump pages for every SWAC/MEAC school and/or foundation’s giving page. We challenge HBCU alumni to give to their own and as many HBCUs as possible.

There are 21 HBCUs between the SWAC/MEAC. That means there are 21 opportunities to give that stretch from Texas to Maryland and impact the institutional opportunities of tens of thousands of African American students, their families, and our communities. How many will you impact?

Alabama A&M University Give now

Alabama A&M University Foundation

 

Alabama State University give now

Alabama state university foundation

 

alcorn state university give now

alcorn state university foundation

 

University of Arkansas Pine Bluff give now

 

Bethune Cookman University Give Now

Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation

 

coppin state university give now

CSU Development Foundation

 

Delaware State University give now

Delaware state university foundation

 

florida a&m university give now

Florida A&M University Foundation

 

Grambling State University Give Now

Grambling University Foundation

 

Howard University Give Now

 

Jackson State University Give Now

Jackson State Development Foundation

 

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Give Now

 

Mississippi Valley State University Give Now

Mississippi Valley State University Foundation

 

Morgan State University Give Now

Morgan State University Foundation

 

Norfolk State University Give Now

NSU Foundation

 

North Carolina A&T State University Give Now

North Carolina A&T Real Estate Foundation

 

North Carolina Central University Give Now

NCCU Foundation

 

Prairie View A&M University Give Now

Prairie View A&M Foundation

 

South Carolina State University Give now

South Carolina State University Foundation

 

Southern University and A&M College Give Now

Southern University System Foundation

 

Texas Southern University Give Now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HBCU Money’s 2018 Top 10 HBCU Endowments


The past 365 days for HBCU endowments has seen a lot of press, mainly led by Bennett College’s #StandWithBennett campaign as the school is embattled and was raising money to retain its accreditation and keep the doors open. A constant reminder of the fragility of HBCUs and their financial uncertainty. Economic conditions in the United States have made overall growth in higher education tempered and with it HBCU endowments have been a mixed bag. While the top ten HBCU endowments have five endowments that beat the median increase in endowment market value, only two endowments beat the national average. In comparison the top ten PWI endowments had eight endowments beat the national median average and seven of the ten exceeding the national average.

Over the past 12 months, the top ten HBCU endowments have increased their market value by $134.5 million or an increase of 7.4 percent over last year. There is plenty of argument that HBCUs should not be compared to the largest PWI endowments in behavior and instead to schools that are comparable in their size and scope. This is certainly a valid argument, but at a time when there are more PWIs with $1 billion plus endowments than there are HBCUs, it maybe hard to continue to lean on such an argument. The reason being is that higher education in general is experiencing and going to continue to consolidation and contraction with education alternatives entering the market. Smaller colleges and HBCUs are going to have to be over capitalized and nimble in order to shift to changing market demands and conditions. At the moment, over 90 percent of HBCUs do not have even $100 million endowments leaving them highly vulnerable as we have seen with the closure of a number of HBCUs in recent years and more than just Bennett in current crisis.

This year we included more than just the top ten, but all HBCUs who reported to NACUBO, which is the reporting endowment organization we use to keep our reporting date uniformed.

All values are in millions ($000)

1. Howard University – $688,562 (6.5%)

2. Spelman College – $389,207 (6.3%)

3.  Hampton University – $285,345 (2.2%)

4.  Meharry Medical College – $159,908 (4.1%)

5.  Morehouse College – $145,139 (2.6%)

6.  North Carolina A&T State University  – $63,827 (14.9%)

7.  University of the Virgin Islands – $61,491 (10.7%)

8.  Tennessee State University – $58,697 (5.1%)

9.  Texas Southern University – $58,158 (7.4%)

10.  Virginia State University – $54,479 (6.6%)

OTHERS REPORTING:

Take a look at how an endowment works. Not only scholarships to reduce the student debt burden but research, recruiting talented faculty & students, faculty salaries, and a host of other things can be paid for through a strong endowment. It ultimately is the lifeblood of a college or university to ensure its success generation after generation.

*Note: The change in market value does NOT represent the rate of return for the institution’s investments. Rather, the change in the market value of an endowment from FY2016 to FY2017 reflects the net impact of: 1) withdrawals to fund institutional operations and capital expenses; 2) the payment of endowment management and investment fees; 3) additions from donor gifts and other contributions; and 4) investment gains or losses.

Alabama A&M University Students Standout At APA’s 2018 National Planning Conference In New Orleans


“Without leaps of imagination or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all is a form of planning.” – Gloria Steinem

This year’s American Planning Association in New Orleans was a success for both the organization and for the exposure that a set of Alabama A&M University students (pictured above) received who were in attendance.

American Planning Association’s history dates back to 1978 when the American Institute of Planners and the American Society of Planning Officials merged and decided to move forward under a united banner with the aim of, “organized exclusively for charitable, educational, literary and scientific purposes to advance the art and science of planning and the activity of planning — physical, economic, and social — at the local, regional, state and national levels.” Today, the website states that the organization’s current vision revolves around, “provides leadership in the development of vital communities by advocating excellence in planning, promoting education and citizen empowerment, and providing our members with the tools and support necessary to meet the challenges of growth and change.” Something that is a vital exploration of HBCU towns and surrounding communities who are often highly undeveloped.

Alabama A&M, located in Huntsville, Alabama, like many rural HBCUs is a flagship institution in the halo geography of its location. Huntsville is home to almost 200 000 residents along with a strong NASA presence. affordable housing, the future for Huntsville could be extremely bright – and therefore Alabama A&M impact on the area could also be . However, who will ultimately play a role in shaping Huntsville’s future? Hopefully, with a strong planning program like the one being developed at AAMU, it will be their alumni who will sit in public office and private firms and shaping the future and influence of the city. Ultimately, a benefit to the institutional capital of Alabama A&M University.

The APA annual conferences and workshops provide intellectual discourse on what is shaping communities is often attended by the who is who among public and private interests looking to get a glimpse into the future of how to provide the assets that will allow them to continue to grow and flourish. Given that HBCUs and the towns they reside in, especially in rural areas, maybe the last bastion of fighting gentrification and building sustainable African American communities, it is vitally important for HBCUs, their professors, and students especially continue to be present.

We were able to catch up with Tayla Solomon, a rising junior at Alabama A&M and Urban Planning major with a minor in Political Science,  who was one of the Bulldogs in attendance at the conference and got her to share her thoughts on attending:

What made you decide to major in Urban Planning? I decided to major in urban planning when I visited spring ‘16. My college counselor, Paula Dofat, made it possible for me and another classmate to drive to AAMU from Baltimore. I knew I wanted to major in something that not only caught my attention but would be if a great impact to the world in many ways.

Was this your first time attending the APA conference? Yes, this was my first planning conference. I’m excited to start fundraising for the next one.

Was Alabama A&M University the only HBCU present that you are aware of? If so, do you think it is important for more HBCUs to be present in the organization and conference? If so, why? AAMU was not the only HBCU at the conference. But there are a limited amount of HBCU’s that are accredited in urban planning. HBCU’s make up a small number in most conferences and most do not have the funds to participate.

What was the most important take away for you from this conference? The most important thing I took away from the conference was to network. There are thousands of people who share the same interest in you and they are also willing to help you and work with you. Once you step out of your comfort zone you will become unstoppable in whatever you put your mind to.

Did you have a favorite workshop that you attended and what was it on? I cannot remember my favorite one exactly but it talked about making vacation area sustainable for long term housing.

Lastly, what is your dream pursuit within the field of planning? My dream is to ensure better living conditions in impoverished cities. I hope to get a chance to work in every field of planning, mainly housing, environmental, and transportation.

If you want to donate to Tayla Solomon and the other Urban Planning students to attend more conferences, please contact: Ms. Heidi Weaver, Secretary, Tel: 256-372-5426, heidi.weaver@aamu.edu

From HBCU To Bank CEO: 4 HBCU Alums Help Lead America’s Black Bank Revival


“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” – John Quincy Adams

What good is a pipeline if it is not used, promoted, strengthened? Going to an HBCU or graduating from is not the beginning or ending of the African American ecosystem, but it is a key part of it. Unfortunately, the data shows that African American intellect and labor (even HBCU graduates) are primarily being used to build up firms owned by other communities. Recent data from the US Census shows that it is likely that less than one percent of African Americans work for an African American owned firm. It stands to reason that the subdata for HBCU graduates working for an African American firm is likely to parallel.

If HBCU business schools are not being trained to run African American firms and the unique path that they face, then what is the point of having them? Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America, and Citigroup all have CEOs that attended PWIs (shocker) and even more to the point, attended Ivy League colleges. It would be fair to say that of the almost 7,000 banking institutions in the United States, if you were to subtract out the African American owned banks, that 75 percent of those banks would not be being run by those who went to HBCUs. However, that is exactly what is happening in the African American banking and private sector in general. The vast majority of our institutions operating in isolation, not in conjunction with each other. HBCUs are not banking with, training for, or encouraging their graduates in choir with African American banks and private sector so therefore the institutional leadership at most of our financial institutions and private firms is using a playbook not tailored to our needs.

However, there does appear to some change on the horizon. OneUnited Bank, headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, and headed by one of the most powerful women in banking Teri Williams, although not an HBCU alum herself is showing herself to be a strong HBCU advocate, and the bank has two HBCUs banking with them in Roxbury Community College (MA) and Florida Memorial University (FL). Something that should lead to many future opportunities for graduates of the two institutions in the future both through internships and employment creating a future pipeline for more HBCU graduates to head up African American owned  firms. So who are the HBCU graduates sitting in African American owned banks c-suites helping lead the current #BankBlack revival that has seen millions of dollars in deposits over the past year?

Dr. Deborah A. Cole; Tennessee State University

As the president of Citizens Bank, headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee and noted as the oldest African American bank still in operation, Dr. Cole has led an impressive increase in the bank’s balance sheet with assets increasing 5.6 percent over 2016, third among the 20 AAOBs.

Ms. Jacquitta Powell Green; Alabama A&M University

A dual role, Ms. Green as she heads up Mobile, Alabama’s Commonwealth National Bank as CEO and Chairwoman of CNB Bancorp, the bank’s holding company. “Mrs. Green is the Vice President of Northside Exchange, which has offered financial services to the unbanked and underserved of the Mobile area for more than 30 years. In 2001, a national tax preparation franchise extended her an offer, and she established Envision Enterprises to offer unbiased and honest tax preparation services.”

Mr. James A. Sills, III; Morehouse College

Mr. Sills heads up one of the most prominent and well known brands among African American owned banks, Mechanics & Farmers’ Bank in North Carolina. The bank has changed its name to M&F Bank a few years ago in an effort to rebrand and attract a young demographic. “Prior to starting his own company in 2007, Mr. Sills was an Executive Vice President of MBNA America Bank (now Bank of America), the largest credit card institution in the world. In this capacity, he served as the Director of Corporate Technology Solutions for the $80 billion US Card Division.”

Ms. Evelyn F. Smalls; North Carolina Central University

Lastly, Ms. Smalls is the President and CEO of United Bank of Philadelphia. The only HBCU graduate heading up a bank outside of the South. “With over 30 years experience in banking and community development, Mrs. Smalls is responsible for the leadership and management of the Bank including setting the direction of the organization, communicating its vision and adapting the culture and operations to achieve success. Her leadership helped transform the Bank’s strategic focus into a “Business Bank” to ensure small businesses have access to affordable loans through the SBA 7A program.”