The HBCU Money™ Weekly Market Watch


Our Money Matters /\ September 23, 2016

A weekly snapshot of African American owned public companies and HBCU Money™ tracked African stock exchanges.

NAME TICKER PRICE (GAIN/LOSS %)

African American Publicly Traded Companies

Citizens Bancshares Georgia (CZBS) $7.16 (0.00% UNCH)

M&F Bancorp (MFBP) $3.90 (0.00% UNCH)

Broadway Financial Corporation (BYFC) $1.71 (0.58% DN)

Radio One (ROIA) $2.96 (4.21% DN)

African ETFs

Global X MSCI Nigeria (NGE) $4.68 (2.09% DN)

Market Vectors Africa (AFK) $20.42 (1.02% DN)

African Stock Exchanges

Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM)  285.39 (0.10% DN)

Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE)  9 766.95 (0.22% UP)

Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE)  1 773.53 (11.10% DN)*

Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE)  134.12 (N/A)

Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) 51 999.45 (0.20% UP)

International Stock Exchanges

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) 10 717.98 (0.70% DN)

London Stock Exchange (LSE)  3 761.85 (0.09% DN)

Tokyo Stock Exchange (TOPIX)  1 349.56 (0.23% DN)

Commodities

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HBCU Money™ Presents: The George W. Carver 2014’s Top 20 HBCU Research Institutions


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In an ode to the greatest HBCU scientist, we have now named our top HBCU research institution list for George Washington Carver.

HBCUs appear to have taken another step back in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2013, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $451.4 million, while 2014 combines for $445.4 million. This represents a 1.34 percent drop year over year and 2.13 percent drop from two years ago.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Florida A&M University at 199 and the twentieth ranked Alcorn State University is listed at 314 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC leads the way with eight schools versus the SWAC with four.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise two schools on the list.
  • Overall, the 1890 HBCUs are fifty percent of the list highlighting agriculture’s importance role in HBCU research.
  1. Florida A&M University – $41.37 million
  2. Morehouse School of Medicine – $41.86 million
  3. Howard University – $40.77 million
  4. North Carolina A&T State University – $35.05 million
  5. Alabama A&M University – $32.91 million
  6. Jackson State University – $$26.61 million
  7. Tuskegee University – $24.95 million
  8. Charles Drew University of Medicine – $20.69 million
  9. University of Virgin Islands – $20.37 million
  10. Tennessee State University – $20.07 million
  11. Meharry Medical College – $19.00 million
  12. Delaware State University – $17.68 million
  13. Morgan State University – $15.72 million
  14. Fayetteville State University – $14.73 million
  15. South Carolina State University – $13.15 million
  16. Prairie View A&M University – $12.29 million
  17. North Carolina Central University – $11.54 million
  18. Hampton University – $11.17 million
  19. Southern University and A&M College – $10.42 million
  20. Alcorn State University – $10.06 million

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $445.4 million ($451.4 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 52:1, an increase from 2013’s 50:1.

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $23.2 billion ($22.5 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $22.3 million

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $948 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $19.5 million

Source: National Science Foundation

HBCU Money™ Presents: 2016’s HBCU Alumni NFL Players’ & Salaries


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In our 4th annual installment of tracking the highest paid HBCU alumni who are NFL players, Tennessee State University, Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie claims the top spot. This is the first year that the Indianapolis Colts have not had the highest paid HBCU player.

HBCU Money™ FACTS:

  • HBCU NFL players combine for $56.4 million, an almost 10 percent increase from 2015, when HBCU NFL players earned $51.44 million.
  • South Carolina State University leads the way with 5 NFL players.
  • 15 HBCUs are represented in the NFL. Up from 14 in 2015.
  • Average salary for HBCU NFL players is $2.08 million, an increase from $2 million in 2015.
  • Median salary for HBCU NFL players is $965 000, down 15 percent from 2015.

D. Rodgers-Cromartie – Tennessee State University

Cornerback / New York Giants / $8.0 million

William Hayes – Winston-Salem State University

Defensive End / St. Louis Rams / $7.0 million

Antoine Bethea – Howard University

Safety / San Francisco 49ers /$6.02 million

Marquette King – Fort Valley State University

Punter / Oakland Raiders / $5.05 million

Robert Mathis – Alabama A&M University

Outside Linebacker / Indianapolis Colts / $5.0 million

Chris Baker – Hampton University

Defensive End / Washington Redskins / $4.27 million

Kendall Langford – Hampton University

Defensive End / Indianapolis Colts / $4.25 million

Terron Armstead – University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Left Tackle / New Orleans Saints / $3.07 million

Larry Donnell – Grambling State University

Tight End / New York Giants / $1.67 million

Rafael Bush – South Carolina State University

Free Safety / Detroit Lions / $1.26 million

Anthony Levine – Tennessee State University

Free Safety / Baltimore Ravens / $1.2 million

Eric Weems – Bethune-Cookman University

Wide Receiver / Atlanta Falcons/ $1.1 million

Don Carey – Norfolk State University

Strong Safety / Detroit Lions / $1.0 million

Justin Durant – Hampton University

Inside Linebacker / Dallas Cowboys / $965,000

Greg Toler – Saint Paul’s College

Cornerback / Washington Redskins / $840,000

Ryan Davis – Bethune-Cookman University

Defensive End / Dallas Cowboys / $675,000

Rodney Gunter – Delaware State University

Defensive End / Arizona Cardinals / $652,479

Javon Hargrave – South Carolina State University

Defensive Tackle / Pittsburgh Steelers / $623,314

Demetrius Rhaney – Tennessee State University

Center / St. Louis Rams / $611,474

Isaiah Crowell – Alabama State University

Running Back / Cleveland Browns / $603,334

Ryan Smith – North Carolina Central University

Cornerback / Tampa Bay Buccaneers / $598,040

Joe Thomas – South Carolina State University

Outside Linebacker / Green Bay Packers / $525,000

Temarrick Hemingway – South Carolina State University

Tight End / St. Louis Rams / $489,896

Antonio Hamilton – South Carolina State University

Safety / Oakland Raiders / $450,000

Anthony Lanier – Alabama A&M University

Defensive End /Washington Redskins / $450,000

Chester Rogers – Grambling State University

Wide Receiver / Indianapolis Colts / $450,000

Zamir Charles – Stillman College

Defensive Tackle / San Diego Chargers / $333,000

The 2015 SWAC/MEAC Athletic Financial Review


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Two years later, students continue to bear a heavy burden for the pursuit of athletics. Our report is a follow up to the 2014 article where the SWAC and MEAC, without student subsidies were losing $130 million annually in athletics in 2013. It is unfortunate to report that the situation has not improved and has in fact gotten worse. HBCUs, especially the SWAC and MEAC, do not have the luxury of boosters like oil tycoon T. Boone Pickens, Nike’s owner Phil Knight, or even Under Armour’s owner Kevin Plank who give millions annually. In the case of Phil Knight, he and his wife have plowed over $300 million into the University of Oregon’s athletic program to bring it to national prominence. An amount that would cover the student fee contributions by SWAC and MEAC students – twice.

Each year the SWAC and MEAC meet for the SWAC/MEAC Challenge sponsored by Disney and this year will meet in the second annual Celebration Bowl, a post-season game to determine the HBCU “national” champion. Sports are an integral part of the college experience this can not be argued, but at what cost? HBCU students, despite HBCUs in general being cheaper than their PWI counterparts, graduate with higher student debt loads. This often delays and/or prevents all together them from becoming future donors back to their schools or boosters to athletics. The lack of African American wealth, both in households and institutions, no doubt plays a huge role. However, the question remains are we sacrificing too much today and forever burdening ourselves tomorrow?

REVENUES (in millions)

Total: $189.5 (up 7.1% from 2013)

Median: $10.2 (up 29.1% from 2013)

Average: $9.5  (up 18.8% from 2013)

Highest revenue: Norfolk State University  $16.1 million

Lowest revenue: Coppin State University  $3.4 million

EXPENSES (in millions)

Total: $194.1 (up 8.6% from 2013)

Median: $10.1 (up 27.8% from 2013)

Average: $9.7 (up 19.8% from 2013)

Highest expenses: Norfolk State University  $16.1 million

Lowest expenses: Coppin State University  $3.9 million

SUBSIDY

Total: $142.5 (up 12.3% from 2013)

Median: $7.9 (up 43.6% from 2013)

Average: $7.1 (up 22.4% from 2013)

Highest subsidy: Norfolk State University $13.5 million

Lowest subsidy: Mississippi Valley State University $2.3 million

PROFIT/LOSS (W/ SUBSIDY)

Total: $-4.6 million (down 142% from 2013)

Median: $-2 000 (in 2013 median was zero)

Average: $-230 071 (down 188% from 2013)

Highest profit/loss: Alabama A&M University  $215 207

Lowest profit/loss: Grambling State University  $-2 044 323

PROFIT/LOSS (W/O SUBSIDY)

Total: $-147.1 million (down 14.4% from 2013)

Median: $-7.8 million (down 34.5% from 2013)

Average: $-7.4 million (down 27.6% from 2013)

CONCLUSION: The SWAC and MEAC have a challenge, but its not on the fields or hardwoods. It is, however, on the income statements and balance sheets of their athletic departments. HBCU b-schools need to be desperately tasked with the assignment of scribing a new business model for HBCU athletics that takes into account alumni wealth (or lack thereof), minuscule payouts by corporations (Celebration Bowl provides roughly $87 000 to each school), and other factors unique to HBCU sports if they are going to lessen the burden on their students who are currently providing 75 percent of the revenues. At current student loan interest rates and traditional investment return rates, the debt burden for just these athletic fees is $1.1 billion over the next 30 years and an investment loss of $4.5 billion over the same period, respectively. These have long-term consequences to families, HBCU endowments, HBCU athletics, ultimately could become cancerous to the very survival of the institutions themselves.

Editor’s Note: Howard and Hampton are excluded in this report because they are private institutions and their athletic finances were not included in this report or the 2013 report. Chicago State, which was included in the 2013 report was excluded in this report.

The HBCU Money™ Weekly Market Watch


Our Money Matters /\ September 16, 2016

A weekly snapshot of African American owned public companies and HBCU Money™ tracked African stock exchanges.

NAME TICKER PRICE (GAIN/LOSS %)

African American Publicly Traded Companies

Citizens Bancshares Georgia (CZBS) $7.38 (0.00% UNCH)

M&F Bancorp (MFBP) $3.80 (8.57% UP)

Broadway Financial Corporation (BYFC) $1.55 (11.93% DN)

Radio One (ROIA) $3.13 (4.33% UP)

African ETFs

Global X MSCI Nigeria (NGE) $4.76 (0.21% DN)

Market Vectors Africa (AFK) $20.11 (0.47% DN)

African Stock Exchanges

Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM)  290.37 (1.08% DN)

Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE)  9 635.48 (0.05% UP)

Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE)  1 784.97 (10.52% DN)*

Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE)  131.58 (N/A)

Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) 51 8322.55 (0.65% DN)

International Stock Exchanges

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) 10 533.13 (0.66% DN)

London Stock Exchange (LSE)  3 670.86 (0.11% DN)

Tokyo Stock Exchange (TOPIX)  1 311.50 (0.80% UP)

Commodities

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