2020 HBCU-Based Credit Unions Directory & Map


HBCU-based credit unions have been largely stagnant in the past four years since our last report in 2016. Assets have increased marginally by $1.7 million or a 1.9 percent. Only the top three HBCU-based credit unions saw increases in their assets of the eleven with all others declining. The asset decline was coupled as well with an acute decline in overall members with an almost 10 percent drop from 2016. With millions of dollars and thousands of potential accounts at their doorstep, it is extremely baffling how these institutions continue to struggle to grow. Especially in an environment of heightened social and economic desire to #BankBlack. The most glaring issue for these credit unions is a lack of FinTech investment. This includes everything from lack of a quality website, debit cards, bill pay, an app, and more. Things that would be considered basics at most financial institutions are still notoriously lacking at HBCU-based credit unions.

In 2012, we published a proposal for a merger among the 11 HBCU-based credit unions (or at the very least an alliance) that would immediately create one of the largest African American credit unions by assets and membership. You can read that here.

  1. Southern Teachers & Parents (LA) – $30.3 million
  2. Florida A&M University (FL) – $22.9 million
  3. Virginia State University (VA) – $10.2 million
  4. Howard University Employees (DC) – $10.1 million
  5. Prairie View (TX) – $3.7 million
  6. Councill (AL) – $2.9 million
  7. Savastate Teachers (GA) – $2.7 million
  8. Arkansas A&M College (AR) – $2.3 million
  9. Xavier University (LA) – $1.7 million
  10. Tennessee State University (TN) – $1.5 million
  11. Shaw University (NC) – $0.4 million

TOTAL ASSETS: $88.7 MILLION

MEDIAN ASSETS: $3.3 MILLION

AVERAGE ASSETS: $8.1 MILLION

TOTAL MEMBERSHIP: 14,953

MEDIAN MEMBERSHIP: 754

AVERAGE MEMBERSHIP: 1,359

Source: National Credit Union Administration

African America’s August 2020 Jobs Report – 13.0%


African American Unemployment Rate %

OVERALL UNEMPLOYMENT: 8.4% (10.2%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN: 13.0% (14.6%)

LATINO AMERICAN: 10.5% (12.9%)

EUROPEAN AMERICAN: 7.3% (9.2%)

ASIAN AMERICAN: 10.7% (12.0%)

Previous month in parentheses.

Analysis: All groups saw drops in their unemployment rates, led by Latino America’s 240 basis point decrease. African Americans had second smallest decrease, with unemployment dropping 160 basis points.

AFRICAN AMERICAN UNEMPLOYMENT RATE BY GENDER & AGE

AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN: 13.2% (15.2%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN: 12.0% (13.5%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN TEENAGE: 24.6% (22.5%)

 

AFRICAN AMERICAN PARTICIPATION BY GENDER & AGE

AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN: 65.9% (65.6%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN: 60.2% (60.2%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN TEENAGE: 29.0% (29.4%)

Analysis: African American Men and Women saw declines in their unemployment rate, rates while African American Teenagers saw an uptick in their unemployment rate by 210 basis points. Participation rates for Men improved marginally, Women saw no improvement, and African American Teenagers saw a second straight month of decline with a 40 basis points decline in August.

African American Men-Women Job Gap: African American women currently have 898,000 more jobs than African American men in August. This is a decrease from 958,000 in July.

CONCLUSION: The overall economy added 1.371 million jobs in August. African America added 367,000 jobs in July or 26.8 percent of the overall jobs. From Yahoo Finance, “The US economy added back a greater than expected number of payrolls in August and the unemployment rate improved by a larger than anticipated margin, as employers continued to bring back workers as virus-related business disruptions abated. Still, the pace of payroll gains slowed relative to recent months. A rise in temporary hiring for the 2020 Census helped boost non-farm payrolls in August, with government jobs jumping by 344,000 month-on-month, including a gain of 238,000 directly due to Census hiring. But in the private sector, nearly ever major industry group in both services and manufacturing added payrolls on net as well.”

Morehouse, Morehouse, Morehouse: 2019’s Million Dollar Donations To HBCUs Dominated By The Tigers Of The AUC


“As I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch what they do.”

–Andrew Carnegie

2019 proved to be a stellar year for HBCUs and million dollar donations. Since HBCU Money began tracking these donors, 2019 has the most million dollar plus donations with eleven, ten to HBCUs directly and one to an HBCU supporting organization. Also in terms of total value of donations 2019 sets the record with $66.1 million. The one hiccup is that the number of donations is still not representative of the percentage of HBCUs to overall colleges and universities. HBCUs accounted for only 2.2 percent of the million dollar plus donations in 2019 (despite accounting for 3 percent of the nation’s colleges). That being said, the sun shined as bright as it ever has in 2019. There will be plenty of complaints that Morehouse College dominates the list with virtually half of the donations, but that also speaks to alumni not investing enough in their HBCU’s development infrastructure which at most HBCUs is an underfunded and understaffed. Endowing positions in the development office is a great place for alumni to see a strong return on investment of their alumni dollars.

High-quality donors (who give consistently and over their lifetime will probably give six to seven figures of donations) continue to show up for HBCUs, but still not representative of HBCUs presence in America’s higher education landscape. While HBCUs represent three percent of the country’s colleges, HBCUs accounted for only 2.2 percent of the million dollar plus donations in 2019. Tranformative donors (who can change the paradigm of an entire institution with one donation) continue to elude HBCUs all together, while PWI/HWCUs landed 10 donations of $100 million plus in 2019. CalTech, a private research focused university in Pasadena, CA, landed an awe inspiring $750 million donation from Stewart & Lynda Resnick.

The gap this year between top eleven PWI/HWCU gifts totaled $2.1 billion while HBCUs as mentioned totaled $66.1 million or a $32 to $1 ratio.

1. Robert F. Smith (pictured) – $34 million
Recipient: Morhouse College
Source of Wealth: Finance

2. Oprah Winfrey – $13 million
Recipient: Morehouse College
Source of Wealth: Media & Entertainment

3. Eugene McGowan, Jr.  – $4.6 million
Recipient: Morehouse College
Source of Wealth: Education

4. Jeffrey Dean & Heidi Hopper – $4 million
Recipient: Howard University
Source of Wealth: Technology

5. Virginia Howerton – $2.5 million
Recipient: Virginia Union College
Source of Wealth: Consulting

6. Shari Griswold – $2 million
Recipient: Prairie View A&M University
Source of Wealth: Oil

7. William Pickard & Judson Pickard, Jr. – $2 million
Recipient: Morehouse College
Source of Wealth: Food & Beverage, Hotels & Casinos

8. Jon Stryker – $2 million
Recipient: Spelman College
Source of Wealth: Family Wealth

9. Robert F. Smith – $1.5 million
Recipient: Morehouse College
Source of Wealth: Finance

10. Oprah Winfrey – $1.5 million
Recipient: UNCF
Source of Wealth: Media & Entertainment

11. Jose Feliciano & Kwanza Jones – $1 million
Recipient: Bennett College
Source of Wealth: Marketing, Finance

Source: Chronicle of Philanthropy

Building Wealth In College: 6 Personal Financial Tips Before You Blow Your HBCU Refund


By William A. Foster, IV

“There are two types of (people) in this world; there are those with guns and the ones with butter. The guns; that’s the real estate, the stocks and bonds, artwork that appreciates with value. The “butta”; cars, clothes, jewelry that don’t mean shit after you buy it.” – Melvin (Baby Boy)

When I arrived at my HBCU many years ago, two decades ago now, it was true before, it was true then, and it is true now – you know on an HBCU campus when refund checks have been disbursed. New wardrobes show up and fashion shows commence across campus, “new” used cars show up with rims and sound systems, and in some cases trips to Jamaica for spring break are coordinated. A full range of African American consumerism is in full bloom. The problem of course is that majority of these refunds are part of a financial aid package that largely includes student loans. This means students are being handed thousands of dollars (with no financial aptitude) that will in their future life turn into tens of thousands of dollars of student loan debt to pay back. But Jamaica will be fun, right? Or in the words of the classic philosopher Riley Freeman (of the Boondocks) after blowing the food money their granddad left them “Now before you start hating, ask yourself – be honest, ain’t I clean though?”

The ripple effect is acute to put it kindly. HBCUs, although significantly cheaper, often find their students graduating with more student loan debt than their counterparts. A result of poor endowments, lack of family resources, and again, poor financial aptitude. Student loan debt, even more so than credit cards, maybe the easiest debt for a college student to obtain. It is also the cheapest unsecured debt that most of us will ever see or have access too in our lifetime – and there is the rub. There is good debt and bad debt. As simple as it can be put, good debt helps you acquire assets that generate income. Bad debt does not. Again, good debt, if used properly helps you acquire assets that can in turn pay off the debt and once paid off continue to pay you passive income. The best example of this I ever witnessed was a classmate of mine who had a part-time job while in school was using his refunds as down payments on rental properties buying one or two a year. By the time we graduated he owned 5-6 rental properties that were all cash flowing. Those rental properties will pay for the mortgages AND his student loans. Eventually leaving him with rental income and appreciation from the properties. Meaning when he takes that trip to Jamaica he could really afford it.

A few things to think about before we get into our tips. Upon graduation, do you expect for someone to give you $10,000 or more dollars? Upon graduation, how will you come up with the deposit for your first apartment? Upon graduation, will you have an emergency fund or savings of any sort? For most HBCU students, there is a resounding no to probably all of those questions, which is why refunds should be treated as close to an “inheritance” as most of us will ever see. If we are smart about it, this will give us the foundation to build transformative wealth.

The TIPS

TIP 1: Learn to say NO. Say no to yourself, to your friends, and for a lot of HBCU students – your family. The last part being the hardest for some. It is a poorly kept secret on a lot of HBCU campuses that a lot of students send portions of their refund checks  home to help their families. Unfortunately, their families are not likely to be helping them pay their student loans after graduation. Without learning to say no you are likely to succumb to your own consumer desires, friends or classmates peer pressure, and families dependency. Just like when flying, put your mask on first. In other words, make sure you establish your financial foundation before overextending yourself to help others. Financial security and stability should be a paramount concern. If you are unsure what that means, always ask yourself this question as you build wealth – if something happened and you could never work again – how long would you be financially okay?

TIP 2: Call a financial advisor and open a brokerage account. There is a misconception that that financial advisers are for the wealthy. This is simply not true. They are for whoever is willing to use them and the earlier you acquire one the more likely you are to make a long-term plan for wealth creation. Remember, you building wealth is in their best interest. If you need help finding a financial advisor, do your homework. There are vultures out there like in any occupation, but there are quality people in the profession as well. This is one time where Google is indeed your friend. A great place to also go – your HBCU’s business school. Just to understand what this has the potential for in the short-term. Imagine your refund is $2,000 a year and we will use the prior five year returns of the S&P 500. The returns on the $2,000 invested each August over the past five years would be worth $14,020 today. Which means the student would have increased their assets by 40 percent with a student loan interest rate that has been under 5 percent for over a decade. There are however downside risk and that should be explained to you by the financial advisor. If they do not explain this, fire them immediately and find a new one.

TIP 3: The financial advisor can help you with this one as well, but it is a specific type of account. Opening a Roth IRA. It is another type of brokerage account, but the difference is you will not have access to the money until you reach the ripe retirement age of 65. The beauty of this account though is you will never pay taxes on the money earned in it. Retirement is often something that African American are ghastly unprepared for financially. If you contributed $2,000 a year to the account during your five years in college and graduated at 22 you would have $10,000 in your account. If invested in the market, which has a historical annual return of 12 percent, and you simply contributed $50 a month going forward for the next 43 years that would give you at the age of 65 over $2 million tax-free.

TIP 4:  Open a CD ladder at your bank or credit union. Every year when you get your refund, go to your bank (preferably a Black Owned Bank) and open a certificate of deposit (CD). Your freshmen year get a four year CD, sophomore year get a three year CD, junior year a two year CD, and so on. Assuming you are getting a minimum of $2,000 in refunds per year and it takes you like many students these days five years to graduate, when you walk across the stage you will have $10,000 to start off in the world with. This will not have the same impact as the previous tip, but is more for those who are a bit more risk averse. While you may not increase your assets by 40 percent, there is also no chance of you losing any of the $10,000 either. If you are not familiar with CD ladders, call your bank, visit the library, Google, and of course as always – your HBCU’s business school.

TIP 5: Start a business. When I was in undergraduate, I wanted to open up a jazz club, but learned very quickly and harshly that nobody wants to lend to just a good idea. Banks, the SBA, and others expected you to have some skin in the captain also known as a down payment of capital. It is also unlikely that you will be able to call home and have family fund your amazing idea. Often times, your refund can serve as the seed capital for your business. Remember, Michael Dell founded Dell Computers in his dorm room. You do not need to be a business major to start a business. You need an idea. It certainly is prudent to visit your HBCU’s business school and ask for guidance on things like setting up the proper paperwork. While there, you may have recruit an accounting student as your CFO and a marketing major as your CMO. Some HBCUs actually house the region’s Small Business Center that is funded by the SBA and they have a lot of free resources at your disposal to help you get on your way.

TIP 6: Create a real estate partnership. Believe it or not, there is still a lot of valuable real estate that is available to be purchased in and around HBCUs. It also protects HBCU communities from gentrification that we have and are seeing around HBCUs like Howard, Texas Southern, Prairie View, and others. If you can find three other like-minded class mates who are all willing to contribute their refunds that would be $8,000 a year and $40,000 by the time of graduation which would give the group buying power of $200,000 worth of real estate. Be it a single-family, duplex, or other kind of rental property. Your refunds could be the start of a real estate empire that in turn would pay off all of you and your classmates student loans and build wealth over the years. Definitely do your homework on this one. Take a real estate class from a reputable place, speak with a local real estate investor who maybe open to mentoring, and of course see what resources your HBCU business school has on the topic.

In the end, whatever you choose to do with your refund, make sure it counts. Remember, this is still debt – whether it becomes good debt or bad debt is ultimately up to you. Getting more financially educated whether you receive a little refund, a big refund, or no refund is vitally important for all HBCU students and their futures.

 

 

African America’s July 2020 Jobs Report – 14.6%


African American Unemployment Rate %

OVERALL UNEMPLOYMENT: 10.2% (11.1%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN: 14.6% (15.4%)

LATINO AMERICAN: 12.9% (14.5%)

EUROPEAN AMERICAN: 9.2% (10.1%)

ASIAN AMERICAN: 12.0% (13.8%)

Previous month in parentheses.

Analysis: All groups saw drops in their unemployment rates, led by Asian America’s 180 basis point decrease. African Americans had the smallest decrease, with unemployment dropping only 80 basis points.

AFRICAN AMERICAN UNEMPLOYMENT RATE BY GENDER & AGE

AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN: 15.2% (16.3%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN: 13.5% (14.0%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN TEENAGE: 22.5% (23.2%)

 

AFRICAN AMERICAN PARTICIPATION BY GENDER & AGE

AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN: 65.6% (65.2%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN: 60.2% (60.0%)

AFRICAN AMERICAN TEENAGE: 29.4% (30.4%)

Analysis: All groups saw declines in their unemployment rate, led by African American men who had a 110 basis point decline and women have the smallest decline of the three groups with only a 50 basis point decline. Participation rates for both men and women increased marginally, but African American Teenagers saw a 100 basis point decline.

African American Men-Women Job Gap: African American women currently have 958,000 more jobs than African American men in June. This is a decrease from 1,023,000 in June.

CONCLUSION: The overall economy added 1.763 million jobs in July. African America added 234,000 in July or 13.3 percent of the overall jobs. From Yahoo Finance, “The services sector again led non-farm payroll gains in July, after the services economy was cut deeply by shelter in place orders and business closures earlier on this year. The leisure and hospitality industry added back 592,000 jobs after gaining nearly 2 million in June, and retail trade jobs increased by 258,000 in July after a rise of more than 800,000 during the prior month. Within services, information-related industries were the only group to shed jobs on net in July, losing 15,000. Within the goods-producing sector, mining and logging jobs fell by 7,000. Government jobs rose by 301,000 in July, after an increase of 54,000 in June.”