Tag Archives: virginia state university

Donate To Every School In The CIAA/SIAC Challenge


How many HBCUs have you donated money too? Below are the jump pages for every CIAA/SIAC school and/or foundation’s giving page. We challenge HBCU alumni to give to their own and as many HBCUs as possible.

There are 25 HBCUs between the CIAA and SIAC with approximately 75,000 students. The two historic HBCU conferences cover a lot of geography from the Midwest to the Southeast and up the eastern coast.

Albany State University Give Now

Albany State University Foundation

Benedict College Give Now

Bowie State University Give Now

Bowie State University Foundation

Central State University Give Now

Central State University Foundation

Claflin University Give Now

Clark Atlanta University Give Now

Elizabeth City State University Give Now

Elizabeth City State University Foundation

Fayetteville State University Give Now

Fort Valley State University Give Now

Fort Valley State University Foundation

Johnson C. Smith University Give Now

Kentucky State University Give Now

Kentucky State University Foundation

Lane College Give Now

LeMoyne-Owen College Give Now

Lincoln University Give Now

The Lincoln Fund

Livingstone College Give Now

Miles College Give Now

Morehouse College Give Now

Paine College Give Now

Saint Augustine’s University Give Now

Savannah State University Give Now

Savannah State University Foundation

Tuskegee University Give Now

Virginia State University Give Now

Virginia State University Foundation

Virginia Union University Give Now

Winston-Salem State University Give Now

Winston-Salem State University Foundation

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HBCU Money’s 2018 Top 10 HBCU Endowments


The past 365 days for HBCU endowments has seen a lot of press, mainly led by Bennett College’s #StandWithBennett campaign as the school is embattled and was raising money to retain its accreditation and keep the doors open. A constant reminder of the fragility of HBCUs and their financial uncertainty. Economic conditions in the United States have made overall growth in higher education tempered and with it HBCU endowments have been a mixed bag. While the top ten HBCU endowments have five endowments that beat the median increase in endowment market value, only two endowments beat the national average. In comparison the top ten PWI endowments had eight endowments beat the national median average and seven of the ten exceeding the national average.

Over the past 12 months, the top ten HBCU endowments have increased their market value by $134.5 million or an increase of 7.4 percent over last year. There is plenty of argument that HBCUs should not be compared to the largest PWI endowments in behavior and instead to schools that are comparable in their size and scope. This is certainly a valid argument, but at a time when there are more PWIs with $1 billion plus endowments than there are HBCUs, it maybe hard to continue to lean on such an argument. The reason being is that higher education in general is experiencing and going to continue to consolidation and contraction with education alternatives entering the market. Smaller colleges and HBCUs are going to have to be over capitalized and nimble in order to shift to changing market demands and conditions. At the moment, over 90 percent of HBCUs do not have even $100 million endowments leaving them highly vulnerable as we have seen with the closure of a number of HBCUs in recent years and more than just Bennett in current crisis.

This year we included more than just the top ten, but all HBCUs who reported to NACUBO, which is the reporting endowment organization we use to keep our reporting date uniformed.

All values are in millions ($000)

1. Howard University – $688,562 (6.5%)

2. Spelman College – $389,207 (6.3%)

3.  Hampton University – $285,345 (2.2%)

4.  Meharry Medical College – $159,908 (4.1%)

5.  Morehouse College – $145,139 (2.6%)

6.  North Carolina A&T State University  – $63,827 (14.9%)

7.  University of the Virgin Islands – $61,491 (10.7%)

8.  Tennessee State University – $58,697 (5.1%)

9.  Texas Southern University – $58,158 (7.4%)

10.  Virginia State University – $54,479 (6.6%)

OTHERS REPORTING:

Take a look at how an endowment works. Not only scholarships to reduce the student debt burden but research, recruiting talented faculty & students, faculty salaries, and a host of other things can be paid for through a strong endowment. It ultimately is the lifeblood of a college or university to ensure its success generation after generation.

*Note: The change in market value does NOT represent the rate of return for the institution’s investments. Rather, the change in the market value of an endowment from FY2016 to FY2017 reflects the net impact of: 1) withdrawals to fund institutional operations and capital expenses; 2) the payment of endowment management and investment fees; 3) additions from donor gifts and other contributions; and 4) investment gains or losses.

HBCU Money™ Presents: 2018’s HBCU Alumni NFL Players’ & Salaries


In our 5th annual installment of tracking the earnings of HBCU alumni who are NFL players, the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff’s Terron Armstead takes the crown.

HBCU Money™ FACTS:

  • HBCU NFL players combine for $38.7 million, an almost 32 percent decline from our last list in 2016, when HBCU NFL players earned $56.4 million.
  • South Carolina State University leads the way with 4 NFL players.
  • 16 HBCUs are represented in the NFL. Up from 15 in 2016.
  • Average salary for HBCU NFL players is $1.8 million, a sharp decrease from $2.1 million in 2016.
  • Median salary for HBCU NFL players is $630,000, down 35 percent from 2016.
  • HBCU players account for 1.3 percent of the NFL’s 32 team active roster spots.
  1. Terron Armstead /University Arkansas-Pine Bluff / Saints / $10.3 million
  2. Antoine Bethea / Howard University / Cardinals / $4.48 million
  3. William Hayes / Winston-Salem State University / Dolphins / $4.05 million
  4. Isaiah Crowell / Alabama State University / Jets / $4 million
  5. Rafael Bush / South Carolina State University / Bills / $2 million
  6. Joe Thomas / South Carolina Sate University / Cowboys / $1.575 million
  7. Brandon Parker / North Carolina A&T State Univ. / Raiders / $1.538 million
  8. Anthony Levine / Tennessee State University / Ravens / $1.4 million
  9. Rodney Gunter / Delaware State University / Cardinals / $705,000
  10. Javon Hargrave / South Carolina State Univ. / Steelers / $691,000
  11. Antonio Hamilton / South Carolina State University / Giants / $630,000 (Tied)
  12. Chester Rogers / Grambling State University / Colts / $630,000 (Tied)
  13. Ryan Smith / North Carolina Central University / Buccaneers / $630,000 (Tied)
  14. Trenton Cannon / Virginia State University / Jets / $619,224
  15. Chad Williams / Grambling State University / Cardinals / $581,500
  16. Tarik Cohen / North Carolina A&T State Univ. / Bears / $555,000 (Tied)
  17. Tony McRae / North Carolina A&T State Univ. / Bengals / $555,000 (Tied)
  18. Michael Ola / Hampton University / Saints / $511,181
  19. Danny Johnson / Southern University / Redskins / $490,000
  20. Trent Scott / Grambling State University / Chargers / $451,674
  21. KhaDarel Hodge / Prairie View A&M University / Rams / $423,529
  22. Jawill Davis / Bethune-Cookman University / Giants / $395,294

HBCU Money’s 2017 Top 10 HBCU Endowments


HBCU endowments after a sluggish few years have bounced back with a spring in their step. Half of this year’s list has double digit gains in their endowment’s market value, which is the best showing since 2014. There are certainly some strong arguments of what has led to this turnaround in the past 365 days. One thing for sure is the strong stock market helped all universities and colleges in increased values. There has also been a renewed interest HBCU engagement among the African American community in general with increased admissions and donations across many HBCU institutions. This always bodes well for future endowments given that much of alumni giving is a numbers game. With the economy by many estimates on growing yet shaky ground, future market value growth for HBCU endowments may rest even more so in the pockets of alumni to steady the ship when rough waters approach so that will be something to keep an eye on.

We can only hope that Howard University (despite this year’s absence) is creeping towards the billion dollar endowment mark because the gap between the Top 10 HWCU/PWI endowments and the Top 10 HBCU/PBI endowments seems to only balloon year after year, with the gap increasing from an approximately $140 billion in 2010 to the current almost $200 billion. A gap that for perspective is twice as much as the world’s richest man, Jeff Bezos, entire net worth. As it stands now, there are 100 HWCU/PWIs with a billion dollar endowment or greater and 10 with a market value of $10 billion and greater.

Although they are far from the Top 10, Texas College continues to impress with their endowment’s market value growth, placing 9th out of the 818 colleges and universities that reported to this year’s NACUBO survey with 33.8 percent growth. Whatever is going on in Tyler, Texas, we encourage others to take note.

1. Howard University – Unreported**

2. Spelman College – $366 056 (5.5%)

3.  Hampton University – $279 093 (10.0%)

4.  Meharry Medical College – $153 653 (7.7%)

5. Florida A&M University – $113 000 (-0.1%)

6.  Tennessee State University – $55 840 (11.1%)

7.  University of the Virgin Islands – $55 549 (1.1%)

8.  North Carolina A&T State University  – $55 231 (14.9%)

9.  Texas Southern University – $54 171 (12.5%)

10. Virginia State University – $51 122 (11.6%)

Take a look at how an endowment works. Not only scholarships to reduce the student debt burden but research, recruiting talented faculty & students, faculty salaries, and a host of other things can be paid for through a strong endowment. It ultimately is the lifeblood of a college or university to ensure its success generation after generation.

 

*Note: The change in market value does NOT represent the rate of return for the institution’s investments. Rather, the change in the market value of an endowment from FY2016 to FY2017 reflects the net impact of: 1) withdrawals to fund institutional operations and capital expenses; 2) the payment of endowment management and investment fees; 3) additions from donor gifts and other contributions; and 4) investment gains or losses.

**Howard University did not report their endowment, but has been ranked number one since our list began. As such, we acknowledge the high probability that they remain as such.

Additional Notes:
NACUBO Average Endowment – $704 527 (8.9%)
NACUBO Median Endowment – $130 963 (6.0%)
Top 10 HWCU Endowments combined – $198.4 billion                                        Top 10 HBCU Endowments combined – $1.9 billion

Source: National Association of College & University Business Officers

2017 National Real Estate Preview: HBCU Alumni Real Estate Agents Look Ahead To The New Year


An HBCU alumna and ally who are now prominent real estate agents sit down and talk with us about what to potentially expect for the year ahead in the real estate market covering coast to coast.

Tiffany Curry (top left) – A Texas Southern University alumna who now works for Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Anderson Properties in Houston, TX.

Kimberly C. Lehman (top right) – An HBCU ally who is married to a Hampton graduate and now owns and runs KC Lehman Realty as a division of John Aaroe Group in Los Angeles, CA.

What do you believe the rate hike in December by the Federal Reserve may do to the coming year of real estate?

TC: I believe the rate spike will motivate buyers that have been on the fence. I think people will fear the rates may continue to rise and that we will see an increase in buyers purchasing homes. Rents are at record highs. It is still less expensive to own vs. lease.

KC: If the interest rates rise in the way we expect, it will impact how much buyers currently in the market can afford. As such, home values should level out, but many buyers will continue to be priced out.

Tell us something that makes you optimistic and pessimistic about the 2017 real estate market?

TC: I’m excited that the 2017 market has already shown positive signs of movement. I currently have clients who are ready to sell and purchase new homes in the first quarter of 2017. I expect my business to double in the 2017 year which is remarkable in the current marketplace. Consumers are seeing value in homeownership and are trading their homes for more space or better locations.

KC:  Optimistic: In Southern California, there is no shortage of buyers, and therefore opportunities for business continues to grow. If values level out, that might balance out the supply and demand which also equals more opportunities for business.

Pessimistic: Uncertainty of our new administration has sellers that ordinarily would sell right now holding tight. Also current home values will cause some buyers who are unwilling to compromise on property location and/or condition to drop out of the game.

Where do you see the most opportunity for real estate investors in your market for 2017?

TC:  In Houston, we have a diverse and growing economy. I see development as an excellent place for investors. Land purchases should be key for investors as the Houston population will nearly double by 2040. Land will become scarce and is a great opportunity for someone that can buy and hold.

KC: Southeast Los Angeles if they are smart. They missed the boat on Inglewood.

Companies like Redfin, Zillow, and others are disrupting the traditional real estate market. How are you seeing their presence influence the real estate market?

TC: Houston is a rare marketplace where we have our own local consumer public facing website, har.com. HAR.com is the only site in the US where Zillow, Realtor.com and others do not hold prominent market share. This has enabled brokers and agents in the market to maintain their presence without the need for an outside third party. Redfin however has come into the marketplace as they offer a discount service. Consumers who want to save on commissions are using their services however it is in line with the traditional discount brokerages that would have attracted this type of consumer. Although they are capturing consumers they still are a very small impact in our local market as most consumers still want the guidance and expertise of a REALTOR that has time to handle their needs rather than one that is focused on transactions.

KC: Buyers and sellers are relying on these sites to educate them about the real estate process and home values. As it relates to the latter, none of these sites are truly accurate. Redfin in particular has gotten their own market share of listings and buyers through their site and their agents are in direct competition with those of us at traditional brokerages. They aren’t always knowledgeable of the areas they are tied to via the site. I’ve heard horror stories!

On the upside, Zillow reviews are liquid gold to agents in the field.

Since reaching its all-time high of 49.1 percent in 2004, African American homeownership has now fallen to an all-time low of 41.1 percent as of third quarter 2016, an almost 20 percent decline. What do you believe can be done in the foreseeable future to reengage the African American consumer?

TC: I believe the African American consumer must be reeducated on the value of homeownership. Homeownership for most Americans is their primary source of wealth and assets. I believe our communities, churches and social groups must put more emphasis on the value of owning the land beneath your feet. As one of the largest groups in consumer spending we must do a better job of prioritizing what we spend our monies on. Material items that depreciate are not the key to wealth. Laying the foundation to a solid financial future for our children and their children’s children are what we must focus on. Building and maintaining our communities by owning what is in them is key.

KC: African Americans need to pool resources in order to compete with the current buyers in the market. Often, our community looks to FHA, NACA, CALHFA and other government programs to help us – but unless we are shopping in low income areas, we can’t compete with the cash offers elsewhere. If we work together and create real estate investment groups we can began to establish potential generational wealth for our heirs.

Thank you for participating ladies and we look forward to your 2018 forecast! To reach these agents please click their names to be directed to their websites.

Tiffany Curry – Houston, TX

KC Lehman  – Los Angeles, CA