Tag Archives: morgan state university

The Conundrum Of HBCUs & American Campus Communities


Glorious shall be the battle when the time comes to fight for our people and our race. – Marcus Garvey

It is often preached that one of the major obstacles to African American economic development is the inability for the African American dollar to circulate within the community. This is often viewed on an individual level by where African Americans shop or eat, but what about at the institutional level? Do African American businesses and institutions like HBCUs also have a role to play in the circulation of the dollar? The answer is without a doubt, yes. Perhaps even more so and more impactful than anything individuals can do. Yet, it seems that when it comes to real estate development and student housing, specifically HBCUs have missed a golden opportunity to circulate millions of dollars within the African American economic ecosystem. To be more blunt, they have failed. That land development is not more revered is somewhat remiss given the lore of the 40 acres and a mule legacy within our communities, but our lack of strategic integration has become others opportunities.

American Campus Communities is a real estate investment trust (REIT) that was co-founded in 1993 by Bill Blayless. Its primary developments are as their name suggest focused on college and universities both on and off campus and primarily housing with some retail mixed in. They have built 206 developments spread across 96 colleges of which 11 have been built on 7 HBCU campuses. Prairie View A&M University, which has a twenty year relationship with ACC,  has the most with four developments with the most recent one opening in 2017. ACC as they are known by their ticker symbol is publicly traded with a market capitalization of $6.1 billion and annual revenue of almost three-quarters of a billion dollars. They have a unique niche in the campus housing development space. However, the story does not simply end there.

If HBCUs are going to do business with developers that are not African American and more importantly HBCU alumni, then there should be something that compels them to do so. A company with an outstanding track record for diversity, a stake of the company in their endowment portfolio, etc. Yet, further examination of American Campus Communities leaves serious questions about exactly who is making the decisions to use them for HBCUs. Of the company’s executive team, senior officers, and board of directors there is not one African American present and no HBCU alumni present either. In fact, there are no ethnic minorities period on the aforementioned groups and only a handful of women. What are decisions like this saying to our community that we so passionately claim to be saying we have the interest of? Are we to believe that there are no African American real estate developers who we trust or are worthy of such projects?

Don Peebles, Sharon Johnson, and Quintin Primo, three African American real estate developers with a combined net worth of almost $2 billion, have developed multi-faceted real estate development corporations and are nationally known certainly would seem more than capable of handling the multi-millions worth of development that happens at HBCUs. There are likely hundreds if not thousands of local African American developers as well like Sharone Mayberry in Houston, Texas who renovated Unity Bank, the only African American owned bank in Texas, and is leading the efforts of renovation in Houston’s historic Third Ward.

It is hardly a surprise that some of these HBCUs are being directed who to use or even having it chosen for them as six of the seven HBCUs who have ACC developments are state schools with Clark Atlanta University being the one private school. Being a public university means that public politics from the gubernatorial office and state politicians have a heavy influence on who receives government and public contracts for work throughout the state. This probably comes with a concerted lobbying effort by ACC to select politicians who make the decisions. The autonomy that state/public schools among the smaller schools (see HBCUs) often marginalizes their decision making while the state’s flagships tend to have the political capital to leverage their own autonomous decisions as it relates to almost every facet of their strategic decision making.

To be clear, this is not a suggestion that all American Campus Communities needs to do is add a token African American to their executive team or board and all is right in the world. That would still not create institutional circulation of the African American dollar and ultimately that is what this is about. If embracing the true circulation and creating a multiplying effect it would take HBCUs concerting with African American financial institutions to sell the bonds that would raise the funds for such construction, then taking that funding and having a request for proposals that ensured HBCU engineers, architects, and developers were a healthy percentage of those who were vying for the bid. Something akin to the Rooney Rule that the NFL uses in ensuring minority coaches get interviewed for head coaching positions that come available. The fact that HBCUs do not seem to be making a more vigorous effort to do this is troublesome.

Time and time again, African American institutions, be it HBCUs, churches, or businesses operate in their own bubble and are not more purposeful in integrating themselves, which makes the dollar within our communities even more difficult to circulate and therefore antagonistic to our institutional economic development. Alumni must deepen their resolve to be involved in not only fundraising for HBCUs, but auditing where those dollars go once they are received. It would be prudent if alumni demanded accountability of just how much of the annual services and products were bought from businesses owned by HBCU alumni. There is a long way to go in moving the needle on circulating our dollars more effectively, but a $10 meal at an African American restaurant versus hundreds of millions in development deals between HBCUs and our own real estate developers is a stark difference in getting us there.

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HBCU Money™ Presents: The George W. Carver 2015’s Top 20 HBCU Research Institutions


HBCUs continue to go backwards in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2014, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $445.4 million, while 2015 combines for $425.7 million. This represents a 4.4 percent drop year over year and 5.5 percent drop from two years ago.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Howard University at 197 and the twentieth ranked Xavier University of Louisiana is listed at 326 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC maintains the way with eight schools versus the SWAC dropping to three after Alcorn State University gave way to XUL.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise four schools on the list, an increase from two in 2014.
  • 1890 HBCUs, land-grant universities, make up for seven of the twenty top HBCU research universities.

Rank. HBCU. Previous Year In Parentheses.

  1. Howard University – $47.3 million ($40.7M)
  2. Florida A&M University – $46.5 million ($46.4M)
  3. North Carolina A&T State Univ. – $35.2 million ($35.0M)
  4. Morehouse School of Medicine – $33.4 million ($41.9M)
  5. Alabama A&M University – $29.2 million ($29.5M)
  6. Tuskegee University – $25.7 million ($24.9M)
  7. Jackson State University – $23.9 million ($26.6M)
  8. University of the Virgin Islands – $20.6 million ($20.4M)
  9. Tennessee State University – $20.0 million ($20.1M)
  10. Delaware State University – $16.0 million ($17.7M)
  11. Hampton University – $14.9 million ($11.2M)
  12. Charles Drew University of Medicine – $14.1 million ($20.7M)
  13. Meharry Medical College – $14.0 million ($19.0M)
  14. Fayetteville State University – $13.7 million ($14.7M)
  15. Morgan State University – $13.6 million ($15.7M)
  16. Prairie View A&M University – $13.1 million ($12.3M)
  17. South Carolina State University – $12.6 million ($12.7M)
  18. North Carolina Central University – $12.4 million ($11.5M)
  19. Clark Atlanta University – $9.9 million ($9.2M)
  20. Xavier University of LA. – $9.6 million ($9.3M)

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $425.7 million ($445.4 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 50:1

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $21.1 billion ($23.2 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $21.3 million

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $990 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $15.5 million

Source: National Science Foundation

2016’s Million Dollar Donations Come Roaring Back For PWIs, But For HBCUs Not So Much


After a timid 2015 where colleges and universities only saw 482 donations and pledges over $1 million, this was the first time since 2012 that less than 500 such donations had been made, donors came roaring back in 2016 with the largest amount of $1 million or more donations ever with 567 such donations and pledges according to The Center of Philanthropy. However, a rising tide does not always lift all boats as HBCUs witnessed. After a banner year in 2014 of nine gifts of $1 million or more that totaled $20.5 million, HBCUs only saw four in 2015 for a total of $7 million. The 2016 numbers are a bit better than the prior year, but not by much.

HBCUs in 2016 received five donations of $1 million or more for a total of $10.5 million. The leading donation comes from Calvin and Tina Tyler (pictured above with Morgan president David Wilson), who gave $5 million to Morgan State University to endow a scholarship for incoming freshmen from the Baltimore area. A gift that should help increase Morgan State’s ability to compete and keep the talent in their backyard at home.

The arms race that is fundraising continues to be an uphill battle for HBCUs who are dealing with a significantly smaller alumni base due to desegregation’s impact a generation ago. African America’s abandonment of most of their own institutional ownership has seen a starvation of institutions that were built to serve African America’s interest almost to the point of extinction. Whether or not a new awakening is on the horizon is more hopeful than optimistic.

To note, Morgan State University becomes the first HBCU since we began tracking in 2013 to appear more than once.

1. Calvin & Tina Tyler – $5 Million
Recipient: Morgan State University
Source of Wealth: UPS

2. James & Marilyn Simons – $2.5 Million*
Recipient: Morehouse College
Source of Wealth: Finance

3. Leonard & Louise Riggio – $1 Million                                                        Recipient: Spelman College
Source of Wealth: Retail

4. Sean Combs – $1 Million*                                                                                    Recipient: Howard University
Source of Wealth: Entertainment

5. Joe Jr. & Kathy Sanderson – $1 Million
Recipient: Alcorn State University
Source of Wealth: Food & Beverage

*Pledge

Source: The Center for Philanthropy

 

HBCU Money™ Presents: The George W. Carver 2014’s Top 20 HBCU Research Institutions


gwcarverlabjpg-3550550efe9ad5fa

In an ode to the greatest HBCU scientist, we have now named our top HBCU research institution list for George Washington Carver.

HBCUs appear to have taken another step back in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2013, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $451.4 million, while 2014 combines for $445.4 million. This represents a 1.34 percent drop year over year and 2.13 percent drop from two years ago.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Florida A&M University at 199 and the twentieth ranked Alcorn State University is listed at 314 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC leads the way with eight schools versus the SWAC with four.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise two schools on the list.
  • Overall, the 1890 HBCUs are fifty percent of the list highlighting agriculture’s importance role in HBCU research.
  1. Florida A&M University – $41.37 million
  2. Morehouse School of Medicine – $41.86 million
  3. Howard University – $40.77 million
  4. North Carolina A&T State University – $35.05 million
  5. Alabama A&M University – $32.91 million
  6. Jackson State University – $$26.61 million
  7. Tuskegee University – $24.95 million
  8. Charles Drew University of Medicine – $20.69 million
  9. University of Virgin Islands – $20.37 million
  10. Tennessee State University – $20.07 million
  11. Meharry Medical College – $19.00 million
  12. Delaware State University – $17.68 million
  13. Morgan State University – $15.72 million
  14. Fayetteville State University – $14.73 million
  15. South Carolina State University – $13.15 million
  16. Prairie View A&M University – $12.29 million
  17. North Carolina Central University – $11.54 million
  18. Hampton University – $11.17 million
  19. Southern University and A&M College – $10.42 million
  20. Alcorn State University – $10.06 million

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $445.4 million ($451.4 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 52:1, an increase from 2013’s 50:1.

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $23.2 billion ($22.5 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $22.3 million

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $948 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $19.5 million

Source: National Science Foundation

2013’s Top 20 HBCU Rankings By Total R&D Expenditures


undergrad_research

HBCUs appear to have taken a step back in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2012, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $455.1 million, while 2013 combines for $450.7 million. This represents a one percent drop year over year. The top 20 HWCU research institutions saw an almost twenty three percent increase over the same period.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Florida A&M University at 197 and the twentieth ranked Virginia State University is listed at 327 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC leads the way with six schools versus the SWAC with four.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise four schools on the list.
  • Overall, the 1890 HBCUs are fifty percent of the list highlighting agriculture’s importance role in HBCU research.
  1. Florida A&M University – $51,149,000
  2. Howard University – $42,789,000
  3. Morehouse School of Medicine – $36,638,000
  4. Jackson State University – $36,264,000
  5. North Carolina A&T State University – $33,994,000
  6. Alabama A&M University – $32,937,000
  7. Meharry Medical College – $22,532,000
  8. Tuskegee University – $21,150,000
  9. University of Virgin Islands – $20,041,000
  10. Charles Drew University – $18,547,000
  11. Delaware State University – $17,295,000
  12. Fisk University – $16,423,000
  13. Tennessee State University – $16,177,000
  14. Morgan State University – $15,475,000
  15. Prairie View A&M University – $13,198,000
  16. South Carolina State University – $13,159,000
  17. Hampton University – $12,461,000
  18. Alcorn State University – $11,315,000
  19. Morehouse College – $9,581,000
  20. Virginia State University – $9,535,000

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $450.7 million ($455.1 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 50:1

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $22.5 billion ($18.3 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion ($910 million) vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $22.5 million ($23 million)

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $969.8 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $17.9 million

Source: National Science Foundation