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Will Morehouse’s 2019 Class Be The Greatest Donors In HBCU History? After Robert F. Smith’s Donation, They Better Be


“The results of philanthropy are always beyond calculation.” – Mary R. Beard

By now we have all heard the breaking news, on May 19th in the year of our lord 2019, Robert F. Smith, an angel of God descended upon the sacred grounds of the AUC in Atlanta, Georgia and in his commencement speech to an estimated 400 Morehouse College graduates also pledged to ensure that his family would pay off each and every one of their student loans. The grant is estimated to be a gift valued at $40 million making it the second largest donation to the HBCU community, still trailing Bill and Camille Cosby’s gift of $20 million in 1988 to Spelman College, which adjusted for inflation is valued at $43.2 million today. Stating the obvious, there still has yet to be a gift of $100 million or more in HBCU history, while HWCUs received 13 gifts of $100 million or more in 2018 alone. This is not to take away at all from Mr. Smith’s gift as the reality that the return on investment to HBCUs  on gifts of $10 million or more are often worth a multiplier effect because of the size of our schools, how starved we are for donations of any sort especially major ones, and lastly our schools often being so adept at doing more with less that when we get more it often feels like it maybe overwhelming (it is not, please feel free to give any HBCU $100 million, seriously). But what will this gift mean to the HBCU landscape for the coming generation?

You hear it all the time among recent HBCU graduates and alumni when asked what are some of their primary reasons for not giving back. At the top of the list tends to pertain to the burden of their student loan debt. It is no secret that HBCU students bear a serious burden when it comes to student loan debt in comparison to their HWCU counterparts, especially those counterparts who attend an institution that is among the Top 50 in college endowments. In our 2016-2017 HBCU Graduate Student Loan Report, 86 percent of HBCU graduates finish with student loan debt at a median debt load of $34,131 versus 40 percent of Top 50 college endowment graduates who finish with student loan debt at a median debt load of $24,237. This is due to a mixture of factors, most notably HBCU endowments and familial wealth.

The top 30 college endowments in America control over 50 percent of the nation’s $500 billion college endowment value, while 100 plus HBCUs control less than 1 percent. Combine this with the African/European American wealth gap not moving for 50 years, which according to a Forbes article, “African-Americans had a median wealth of $13,460 in 2016 or only 9.5% of the median wealth of $142,180 of whites”. These major pinpoints make it extremely difficult for HBCU graduates to reduce their student debt loads while matriculating and therefore build wealth after college. The result becomes they are either prolonged before they can become donors or never do and the sword of educated poverty is what they and our institutions fall upon decade after decade with no end in sight.

Morehouse College Class of 2019 though sits in a special position to change the trajectory of not only Morehouse College’s endowment, which we have argued has grossly under performed compared with the likes of Hampton, Spelman, and Howard in its fundraising efforts. This despite the help from the likes of another billionaire, Oprah Winfrey, who herself as put hundreds of Morehouse Men through college as well. To what extent her giving to Morehouse has reduced student loan debt for graduates is unknown, but knowing Ms. Winfrey’s giving history, it has been formidable. However, the Class of 2019 may prove to be worth a longitudinal study in HBCU philanthropy. What happens when an HBCU graduate finishes with little or in this case no student loan debt? Do they see it as an opportunity to be more active donors back to their institution and to other HBCUs. Will their donor rate be higher than other classes? It is no secret that despite the Morehouse pride, the alumni giving rate at the institution has been underwhelming at best. If these 400 young men properly build their wealth and give back to Morehouse and other HBCUs, then have we potentially unlocked one of the keys to making our institutions sustainable? We have also long argued what it would look like if African Americans supported HBCUs in a major way, even if they did not attend an HBCU. Giving because a strong African American institution of any sort is a reflection of themselves in society and that our fates are always intertwined. That a people are ultimately only as strong as the institutions that represent their interest.

However, to do what Robert F. Smith did on an institutional level is going to require more than just one billionaire (or even two), but it is definitely a pivotal step in the right direction – hopefully. After all, it has been over three decades since a donation of this size for HBCUs. The lack of multimillion dollar gifts to HBCUs and African American educational institutions in general has been, continues to be, and is problematic systemically. For instance, if we extrapolated the notion of helping HBCU graduates be debt free, endowments at our institutions would have to be exponentially greater than what they are now. Howard University, Spelman College, and Hampton University, the three largest HBCU endowments, which have current endowments of $688 million, $389 million, and $285 million, respectively, would need endowments exceeding $6 billion, $1.7 billion, and $2.5 billion, respectively. In other words, they currently have a combined endowment value of $1.4 billion but need $10.2 billion, which is a margin of $8.8 billion, greater than Robert F. Smith and Oprah Winfrey’s wealth combined, an estimated $7.6 billion. This of course speaks nothing of and to the number of HBCUs who are hanging on for dear financial life and whose endowments if they even exist are paltry at best. Like many small and state colleges, lesser known HBCUs struggle to attract major donors, but the Morehouse 400 does/should know who they are and should take the vanguard in being integral over the next 50-60 years of ensuring that all HBCUs drink from the fountain of opportunity that they have been granted access too. These young men have a chance to alter the trajectory of the HBCU universe and we hope with this great opportunity they have been gifted that they also know comes a great responsibility. Will they become the greatest HBCU donors in HBCU history? Only time will tell.

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6 Financial Things HBCU Men Must Do Before Getting In A Serious Relationship


Teach self-denial and make its practice pleasure, and you can create for the world a destiny more sublime that ever issued from the brain of the wildest dreamer. – Sir Walter Scott

So you are a man now you say? You have graduated from your HBCU with degree in hand and maybe you have your dream job, maybe you are still looking, and maybe you are contemplating going to graduate school. Regardless of where you are in life, there is a strong chance that you have a desire to be in love. Before you give someone the world, make sure you have taken care of a few things before you embrace the responsibility that comes with a serious relationship.

Societal norms put the financial burden of courtship on men in heterosexual relationships. Historically, this makes sense because it has only been in very recent decades that women have earned the right to their own financial independence within many societies and in more than a few still have limited financial rights. However, this presents a bit complicated in the United States for African America where the women have surpassed men by leaps and bounds in almost every major category. It also does not help that African American men have the highest unemployment rate among all groups in the country, which creates a courtship complexity of sorts within the community. African American men who are 20-24 years old as of December 2018 had a 11.8 percent unemployment rate, while their European American men peers were at 5.9 percent and African American women peers were 7.5 percent. That being said, for African American men who are part of the LGBTQ community, the instability can be even more pronounced since both parties are part of the most vulnerable economic population and will be facing additional discrimination.

A relationship can be an expensive endeavor, according to a USA Today study the average date cost $102.32 and if you assume one date a week in a relationship that comes out to a total of $5,320.64 per year. This of course is not including special dates or holidays where the purchase of gifts, etc. can drive that cost even higher. The problem of course is that African American median income, last among all ethnic groups, is at $40,258 according to the 2017 Census. In other words, over 13 percent of African American income can be used up in dating, while no other groups even spend 10 percent.

To say the calculus is complicated would be an understatement. Do African Americans simply not date? This of course would be problematic since one of the fundamental ways of building wealth is through the scalability of marriage. Instead, get a strong financial foundation under you by adhering to these six principles and objectives:

BE HONEST. BE HONEST. BE HONEST.

This honestly could be the whole article, but it is certainly worth leaning into. Being honest about your finances up front with the person you are dating can take a lot of pressure off them and yourselves. This does not mean you have to tell them everything right away, but if you can not afford to do something tell them and do not feel ashamed of it. If you want to share with them that you have certain financial goals you want to meet, then do so and let them be part of what you are trying to accomplish not an adversary to it.

HAVE AN EMERGENCY FUND – NO, SERIOUSLY.

African American men are the most vulnerable population as it relates to employment as the numbers bear out. As such, if you are a recent graduate and happen to have employment you can not save fast enough. Most personal finance experts will say as a general rule 3-6 months of expenses is a healthy emergency fund, but for African American men 9-12 months is much more imperative. An emergency fund can take the edge off of dating because you know that you and your date are not spending your potential car note or rent payment. Do NOT touch it except for an emergency. Also, do not base your emergency fund off expenses, but instead use gross income. You want to have 9-12months of gross incomes saved. Saving based on  your income instead of expenses will allow you to maintain some semblance of a normal life should an emergency arise.

SET EXPECTATIONS AND A BUDGET.

Once you decide to send someone flowers every Monday, fine dining every Friday, and a trip every other month you have set an expectation. Now, this is not to say you can not do those things, but they need to be within the confines of your budget. You should have an amount that you are going to spend every month on dating activities. If you want to save for something a bit more costly, spend a bit less each month and set it aside until you can afford that moment. Should your finances change and you need to alter the budget and expectations, remember – be honest.

BE CREATIVE.

Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to spend a lot on someone to let them know you care about them. The internet is full of helpful resources that can help you create low to no cost dates. Feel free to also use your social media networks for ideas.

DO NOT CONFUSE INCOME WITH WEALTH.

Income is not wealth. Again, income is NOT wealth. Assets build wealth and you have to use your income to acquire assets. Beyond your emergency fund, you should be thinking about saving to invest in stocks, bonds, real estate, etc. Find a financial/investment adviser as soon as you have a job. You do not have to wait until you have “money” to start investing. The earlier you start, the greater chance you will have of creating wealth over the long-term. Passive income, money earned from not having to work, should be a central focus of what you use your income for. Do no squander away the opportunity to set up yourself and future family while you have the opportunity.

LEAVE THE MATERIALISM FOR SOMEONE ELSE.

We have all seen that friend or friends who gets a job after college and decides to go on a spending spree for the nice car, clothes, and showing off for Instagram. This is not the man you want to be. Becoming a slave to material possessions and forsaking your financial future while being part of a labor population that is the most vulnerable is not only not smart, but dangerous. Material things lose value and defer from your ability to invest among other things.

Ultimately, if you are a man and are not financially safe or stable, then you are not ready for a serious relationship with anyone. Do not confuse stable for rich. Most of the time financially stability can be achieved in a relatively short period with the proper sacrifices (like having a roommate or two or three) after graduating. Becoming financially literate is vital to helping remove the stresses of finances in African American relationships. A stress that is often noted as being the greatest area of conflict within relationships. After all, love does not cost a thing, but bad financial habits do.

 

HBCU Money’s 2019 African American Owned Bank Directory


All banks are listed by state. In order to be listed in our directory the bank must have at least 51 percent African American ownership. You can click on the bank name to go directly to their website.

OTHER KEY FINDINGS:

  • AAOBs are in 16 states and territories. Key states absent are Florida, Mississippi, New York, Ohio, and Virginia.
  • There has not been an AAOB started in 18 years.
  • Only 4 of 2018’s 19 AAOBs saw increases in assets, down from 11 last year.
  • Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee, each have two AAOBs.
  • Only 5 of the 19 remaining AAOBs saw increases in assets. A drop of over 50 percent from 2018, when 11 AAOBs saw increases.
  • African American Owned Banks have approximately $4.1 billion of America’s $17.1 trillion bank assets or 0.02 percent.
  • AAOBs control 1.8 percent of FDIC designated Minority-Owned Bank Assets, which is down from 1.9 percent in 2018. A second straight year of declines.
  • 2018 Median AAOBs Aseets: $142,129,000 ($133,096,000)*
  • 2018 Average AAOBs Assets: $217,533,000 ($222,831,000)*
  • For comparison, Asian American Owned Banks have approximately $119.4 billion in assets spread over 75 institutions. Asian AOBs saw an increase of $7 billion increase (6.2 percent) in assets from 2018, while African American Owned Banks saw a 2.4 percent decrease in assets.
  • TOTAL AFRICAN AMERICAN OWNED BANK ASSETS: $4,133,126,000

 

ALABAMA

ALAMERICA BANK

Location: Birmingham, Alabama

Founded: January 28, 2000

FDIC Region: Atlanta

Assets: $27,122,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 23.2%

COMMONWEALTH NATIONAL BANK

Location: Mobile, Alabama

Founded: February 19, 1976

FDIC Region: Atlanta

Assets: $46,771,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 5.5%

CALIFORNIA

BROADWAY FEDERAL BANK FSB

Location: Los Angeles, California

Founded: February 26, 1947

FDIC Region: San Francisco

Assets: $417,335,000

Asset Change (2018): Up 1.4%

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

INDUSTRIAL BANK

Location: Washington, DC

Founded: August 18, 1934

FDIC Region: New York

Assets: $421,121,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 0.5%

GEORGIA

CARVER STATE BANK

Location: Savannah, Georgia

Founded: January 1, 1927

FDIC Region: Atlanta

Assets: $39,686,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 5.7%

CITIZENS TRUST BANK

Location: Atlanta, Georgia

Founded: June 18, 1921

FDIC Region: Atlanta

Assets: $395,923,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 7.6%

ILLINOIS

GN BANK  (FORMERLY ILLINOIS SERVICE FEDERAL)

Location: Chicago, Illinois

Founded: January 01, 1934

FDIC Region: Chicago

Assets: $142,129,000

Asset Change (2018): Up 6.8%

LOUISIANA

LIBERTY BANK & TRUST COMPANY

Location: New Orleans, Louisiana

Founded: November 16, 1972

FDIC Region: Dallas

Assets: $596,695,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 1.5%

MARYLAND

HARBOR BANK OF MARYLAND

Location: Baltimore, Maryland

Founded: September 13, 1982

FDIC Region: New York

Assets: $284,055,000

Asset Change (2018): Up 6.7%

MASSACHUSETTS

ONEUNITED BANK

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Founded: August 02, 1982

FDIC Region: New York

Assets: $649,058,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 1.4%

MICHIGAN

FIRST INDEPENDENCE BANK

Location: Detroit, Michigan

Founded: May 14, 1970

FDIC Region: Chicago

Assets: $255,617,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 10.8%

NEW JERSEY

CITY NB OF NEW JERSEY

Location: Newark, New Jersey

Founded: June 11, 1973

FDIC Region: New York

Assets: $180,631,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 15.5%

NORTH CAROLINA

MECHANICS & FARMERS BANK

Location: Durham, North Carolina

Founded: March 01, 1908

FDIC Region: Atlanta

Assets: $262,050,000

Asset Change (2018): Up 2.9%

PENNSYLVANIA

UNITED BANK OF PHILADELPHIA

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Founded: March 23, 1992

FDIC Region: New York

Assets: $54,055,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 8.4%

SOUTH CAROLINA

SOUTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY BANK

Location: Columbia, South Carolina

Founded: March 26, 1999

FDIC Region: Atlanta

Assets: $59,771,000

Asset Change (2018): Up 13.7%

TENNESSEE

CITIZENS SAVINGS B&T COMPANY

Location: Nashville, Tennessee

Founded: January 4, 1904

FDIC Region: Dallas

Assets: $104,819,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 2.2%

TRI-STATE BANK OF MEMPHIS

Location: Memphis, Tennessee

Founded: December 16, 1946

FDIC Region: Dallas

Assets: $83,180,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 4.0%

TEXAS

UNITY NB OF HOUSTON

Location: Houston, Texas

Founded: August 01, 1985

FDIC Region: Dallas

Assets: $89,522,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 6.8%

WISCONSIN

COLUMBIA SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Founded: January 1, 1924

FDIC Region: Chicago

Assets: $23,586,000

Asset Change (2018): Down 1.6%

HBCU Money’s 2018 Top 10 HBCU Endowments


The past 365 days for HBCU endowments has seen a lot of press, mainly led by Bennett College’s #StandWithBennett campaign as the school is embattled and was raising money to retain its accreditation and keep the doors open. A constant reminder of the fragility of HBCUs and their financial uncertainty. Economic conditions in the United States have made overall growth in higher education tempered and with it HBCU endowments have been a mixed bag. While the top ten HBCU endowments have five endowments that beat the median increase in endowment market value, only two endowments beat the national average. In comparison the top ten PWI endowments had eight endowments beat the national median average and seven of the ten exceeding the national average.

Over the past 12 months, the top ten HBCU endowments have increased their market value by $134.5 million or an increase of 7.4 percent over last year. There is plenty of argument that HBCUs should not be compared to the largest PWI endowments in behavior and instead to schools that are comparable in their size and scope. This is certainly a valid argument, but at a time when there are more PWIs with $1 billion plus endowments than there are HBCUs, it maybe hard to continue to lean on such an argument. The reason being is that higher education in general is experiencing and going to continue to consolidation and contraction with education alternatives entering the market. Smaller colleges and HBCUs are going to have to be over capitalized and nimble in order to shift to changing market demands and conditions. At the moment, over 90 percent of HBCUs do not have even $100 million endowments leaving them highly vulnerable as we have seen with the closure of a number of HBCUs in recent years and more than just Bennett in current crisis.

This year we included more than just the top ten, but all HBCUs who reported to NACUBO, which is the reporting endowment organization we use to keep our reporting date uniformed.

All values are in millions ($000)

1. Howard University – $688,562 (6.5%)

2. Spelman College – $389,207 (6.3%)

3.  Hampton University – $285,345 (2.2%)

4.  Meharry Medical College – $159,908 (4.1%)

5.  Morehouse College – $145,139 (2.6%)

6.  North Carolina A&T State University  – $63,827 (14.9%)

7.  University of the Virgin Islands – $61,491 (10.7%)

8.  Tennessee State University – $58,697 (5.1%)

9.  Texas Southern University – $58,158 (7.4%)

10.  Virginia State University – $54,479 (6.6%)

OTHERS REPORTING:

Take a look at how an endowment works. Not only scholarships to reduce the student debt burden but research, recruiting talented faculty & students, faculty salaries, and a host of other things can be paid for through a strong endowment. It ultimately is the lifeblood of a college or university to ensure its success generation after generation.

*Note: The change in market value does NOT represent the rate of return for the institution’s investments. Rather, the change in the market value of an endowment from FY2016 to FY2017 reflects the net impact of: 1) withdrawals to fund institutional operations and capital expenses; 2) the payment of endowment management and investment fees; 3) additions from donor gifts and other contributions; and 4) investment gains or losses.

HBCU Money™ Turns 7 Years Old


By William A. Foster, IV

“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

Seven years strong with so much more to do. The past two years have been a test of mettle for HBCU Money and HBCU journalism as a whole. As journalism and media as a whole are becoming an even more complicated business with much of larger media being purchased by a small class of people who can afford to pour resources into it without needing it to make any money, yet leveraging the benefits of shaping public opinion it leaves an industry in flux. This dynamic leaves many smaller imprints with less external resources in a precarious position. Making enough money to keep the doors open, grow, and still able to put some Ramen noodles on the table for our families.

HBCU media ownership has, is, and will continue to be a labor of love certainly, but if we want it to scale to the level of influence we need in our community we need to have real conversations about just how and what needs to happen for that scale to take place. The importance of HBCU owned media can not afford to have all chiefs and no warriors.

At HBCU Money, I am excited for some of the things ahead that have been in the works for quite a few years on the drawing board finally getting off the board. Unfortunately, some of it maybe the leap of faith more than the resources available. Seven years into this though, faith is certainly something never to take for granted. I thank everyone who has restored it when it has been shaken and filled up the bucket when it was running low. There are too many to name, but you are appreciated. It is my hope that HBCU Money can continue to be worthy of your support and faith.