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HBCU Money™ Presents: The George W. Carver 2015’s Top 20 HBCU Research Institutions


HBCUs continue to go backwards in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2014, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $445.4 million, while 2015 combines for $425.7 million. This represents a 4.4 percent drop year over year and 5.5 percent drop from two years ago.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Howard University at 197 and the twentieth ranked Xavier University of Louisiana is listed at 326 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC maintains the way with eight schools versus the SWAC dropping to three after Alcorn State University gave way to XUL.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise four schools on the list, an increase from two in 2014.
  • 1890 HBCUs, land-grant universities, make up for seven of the twenty top HBCU research universities.

Rank. HBCU. Previous Year In Parentheses.

  1. Howard University – $47.3 million ($40.7M)
  2. Florida A&M University – $46.5 million ($46.4M)
  3. North Carolina A&T State Univ. – $35.2 million ($35.0M)
  4. Morehouse School of Medicine – $33.4 million ($41.9M)
  5. Alabama A&M University – $29.2 million ($29.5M)
  6. Tuskegee University – $25.7 million ($24.9M)
  7. Jackson State University – $23.9 million ($26.6M)
  8. University of the Virgin Islands – $20.6 million ($20.4M)
  9. Tennessee State University – $20.0 million ($20.1M)
  10. Delaware State University – $16.0 million ($17.7M)
  11. Hampton University – $14.9 million ($11.2M)
  12. Charles Drew University of Medicine – $14.1 million ($20.7M)
  13. Meharry Medical College – $14.0 million ($19.0M)
  14. Fayetteville State University – $13.7 million ($14.7M)
  15. Morgan State University – $13.6 million ($15.7M)
  16. Prairie View A&M University – $13.1 million ($12.3M)
  17. South Carolina State University – $12.6 million ($12.7M)
  18. North Carolina Central University – $12.4 million ($11.5M)
  19. Clark Atlanta University – $9.9 million ($9.2M)
  20. Xavier University of LA. – $9.6 million ($9.3M)

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $425.7 million ($445.4 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 50:1

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $21.1 billion ($23.2 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $21.3 million

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $990 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $15.5 million

Source: National Science Foundation

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HBCU Money™ Presents: The George W. Carver 2014’s Top 20 HBCU Research Institutions


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In an ode to the greatest HBCU scientist, we have now named our top HBCU research institution list for George Washington Carver.

HBCUs appear to have taken another step back in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2013, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $451.4 million, while 2014 combines for $445.4 million. This represents a 1.34 percent drop year over year and 2.13 percent drop from two years ago.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Florida A&M University at 199 and the twentieth ranked Alcorn State University is listed at 314 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC leads the way with eight schools versus the SWAC with four.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise two schools on the list.
  • Overall, the 1890 HBCUs are fifty percent of the list highlighting agriculture’s importance role in HBCU research.
  1. Florida A&M University – $41.37 million
  2. Morehouse School of Medicine – $41.86 million
  3. Howard University – $40.77 million
  4. North Carolina A&T State University – $35.05 million
  5. Alabama A&M University – $32.91 million
  6. Jackson State University – $$26.61 million
  7. Tuskegee University – $24.95 million
  8. Charles Drew University of Medicine – $20.69 million
  9. University of Virgin Islands – $20.37 million
  10. Tennessee State University – $20.07 million
  11. Meharry Medical College – $19.00 million
  12. Delaware State University – $17.68 million
  13. Morgan State University – $15.72 million
  14. Fayetteville State University – $14.73 million
  15. South Carolina State University – $13.15 million
  16. Prairie View A&M University – $12.29 million
  17. North Carolina Central University – $11.54 million
  18. Hampton University – $11.17 million
  19. Southern University and A&M College – $10.42 million
  20. Alcorn State University – $10.06 million

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $445.4 million ($451.4 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 52:1, an increase from 2013’s 50:1.

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $23.2 billion ($22.5 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $22.3 million

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $948 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $19.5 million

Source: National Science Foundation

2013’s Top 20 HBCU Rankings By Total R&D Expenditures


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HBCUs appear to have taken a step back in the research field according to the latest National Science Foundation data. In 2012, research expenditures for the top 20 HBCUs combined for $455.1 million, while 2013 combines for $450.7 million. This represents a one percent drop year over year. The top 20 HWCU research institutions saw an almost twenty three percent increase over the same period.

  • The top ranked HBCU is Florida A&M University at 197 and the twentieth ranked Virginia State University is listed at 327 in America’s college research landscape.
  • MEAC leads the way with six schools versus the SWAC with four.
  • Division II/III schools also comprise four schools on the list.
  • Overall, the 1890 HBCUs are fifty percent of the list highlighting agriculture’s importance role in HBCU research.
  1. Florida A&M University – $51,149,000
  2. Howard University – $42,789,000
  3. Morehouse School of Medicine – $36,638,000
  4. Jackson State University – $36,264,000
  5. North Carolina A&T State University – $33,994,000
  6. Alabama A&M University – $32,937,000
  7. Meharry Medical College – $22,532,000
  8. Tuskegee University – $21,150,000
  9. University of Virgin Islands – $20,041,000
  10. Charles Drew University – $18,547,000
  11. Delaware State University – $17,295,000
  12. Fisk University – $16,423,000
  13. Tennessee State University – $16,177,000
  14. Morgan State University – $15,475,000
  15. Prairie View A&M University – $13,198,000
  16. South Carolina State University – $13,159,000
  17. Hampton University – $12,461,000
  18. Alcorn State University – $11,315,000
  19. Morehouse College – $9,581,000
  20. Virginia State University – $9,535,000

TOP 20 COMBINED TOTAL: $450.7 million ($455.1 million)

Additional Notes

The HWCU-HBCU gap for research among top 20 research institutions is 50:1

Top 20 HWCUs Combined: $22.5 billion ($18.3 billion)

Top 20 Average HWCU – $1.1 billion ($910 million) vs. Top 20 Average HBCU – $22.5 million ($23 million)

Top 20 Median HWCUs – $969.8 million vs. Top 20 Median HBCU – $17.9 million

Source: National Science Foundation

The HBCU Endowment Feature – Delaware State University


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School Name: Delaware State University

Median Cost of Attendance: $16 460

Undergraduate Population: 3 744

Endowment Needed: $1 232 524 800

Analysis: Delaware State University needs approximately a $1.2 billion endowment for all of its undergraduates to attend debt free. The school is located in Dover, DE and is the only HBCU in the state. Although the states demographics lend to over 20 percent of the population being African American, it should be noted that the state itself has less than 1 million citizens. This means DSU must rely heavily on recruiting from outside of its state borders to build its population. Delaware is surrounded by Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. The latter presenting a prime opportunity since it does not actually have an HBCU located within its borders. Delaware State University because of this could become more integrated with that reality and offer “in-state” tuition to those citizens in New Jersey. Especially, given the presence of cities like Newark, New Jersey which have a strong African American population and have the potential for sound social and economic ties to Delaware State University. The state of Delaware itself is the legal “home” to more than 50 percent of U.S. public companies and two-thirds of Fortune 500 companies. Being a prominent state of where companies set up their legal home suggest a revenue opportunity is available to Delaware State University and its alumni to create programs and services to existing companies and forming companies. With an endowment just over $20 million the university is sitting in an economic hub of sorts and access to the New Jersey population could easily make a run into the top ten HBCU endowments. It does face increasing dangers of trying to become too ethnically diverse and could lose its HBCU appeal. This red flag is primarily because of the unknown data as of yet as to just how committed non-African American alumni are as donors to their HBCUs. There is much to like about the direction of the endowment situation at Delaware State University but there are some concerns for a school in a state with limited in-state population unless it becomes more creative in recruitment.

As always it should be noted that endowments provide a myriad of subsidies to the university for everything from scholarship, faculty & administration salaries, research, and much more.

The HBCUpreneur Corner – Delaware State University’s Chris Stevens & Stevens Communications & Consulting


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Name: Chris Stevens

Alma Mater: Delaware State University, Class of 2007

Business Name & Description: Stevens Communications & Consulting (stevenscommcons.com), a multi-media business specializing in assistance with writing/editing, social media management and consulting for small businesses, as well as producing an internet radio show/podcast, “All Subjects Everything.” We also have advertising space open on the show, which is $10 per week or $40 per month for anyone who wants to advertise their business/organization/event on our show.

What year did you found your company? 2012

What was the most exciting and/or fearful moment during your HBCUpreneur career? Actually just getting started. It’s been an ongoing process these first 9 months as I’ve had to re-assess everything I thought I knew about the media industry and most important of all, myself. A social introvert starting a business that thrives on interpersonal communication has been a harrowing experience, but a necessary step.

What made you want to start your own company? I worked as a sports reporter for community newspapers for 5 years and I didn’t like the direction the business was going in as well as I wanted to do my own thing and not have to answer to anyone but myself and my clients/customers. So I took the things I knew best (social media, writing, editing) and decided to strike out on my own.

Who was the most influential person/people for you during your time in college? Two professors for different reasons. Dr. Yohuru Williams, who is now at Fairfield University, and DeWayne Wickham, a syndicated columnist with USA Today, who was a scholar-in-residence at DSU for a while. Dr. Williams gave me the courage and confidence to be a student of life, just to keep learning and incorporate what you’ve learned into whatever you’re doing in life while Professor Wickham showed me how vital networking is and I’m still putting those lessons about “who you know” into practice.

How do you handle complex problems? For me, asking questions is vital. You never want to have misunderstanding or miscommunication with a client or customer, so you always ask questions to make sure you have everything tailored to their needs and if you fall short, keep trying until you get it right. My first client, I did some serious re-writing for and it was a fun and challenging experience that let me know that this wasn’t going to be easy, but it would be rewarding.

What is something you wish you had known prior to starting your company? Never a good idea to start cold. If you’re starting a business, be sure to save some money and be in a position to weather some rough times. I left my job thinking I could apply my knowledge and start off well. I’ve had some lean periods because of that, but I wouldn’t change the journey because I get to share that experience now and hopefully someone else will learn from the mistakes I’ve made.

What do you believe HBCUs can do to spur more innovation and entrepreneurship while their students are in school either as undergraduate or graduate students? Certainly one way is to show them the perils of traditional employment. You can see it everyday – people who give their all to improve someone else’s bottom line can find themselves jobless at the drop of a hat. Depending on someone else signing your check to live life is so overrated. Also, HBCUs can draw on their own history as self-starters and self-reliant institutions to foster that spirit of entrepreneurship, that it’s “in the blood,” so to speak.

How do you deal with rejection? I hate rejection in ALL facets of my life, but surprisingly, business rejection is much easier to take because I know it’s not personal. It bothers me, but the key is to keep trying. The no’s are plentiful, but the one or two acceptances you get are your chance to make an impression and set yourself up for something bigger. The key is to keep plugging away. If you believe in your vision and what you’re offering, sooner or later, people will see that and will be willing to help and take a chance on you and your business.

When you have down time how do you like to spend it? I’m always reading, I just finished up “The Warmth of Other Suns” by Isabel Wilkerson which is a phenomenal book about the Great Migration of Blacks from the South to the Midwest, East and West Coasts. I love music also, I blog about music on my personal website (chrisstevenssite.com) from time to time and I love discussing/arguing sports with just about anyone.

What was your most memorable HBCU memory? It’s hard to pinpoint just one because I’ve had so many, so I’ll just say the experience of being a part of the HBCU experience. My own good times at Del State, visiting other HBCUs while working for the Hornet newspaper, it was a special time for me and I’m proud to be a part of HBCU tradition and I will stand for Black Colleges until I can’t stand up anymore. And even then I’ll be shouting for them from my bed or wheelchair.

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In leaving is there any advice you have for budding HBCUpreneurs? A few things to note: Have a vision, be confident in that vision and go for it. You never want to spend the rest of your life wondering “Woulda, coulda, shoulda.” My mother always tells me “nothing beats a failure but a try,” so go for it. If there’s an idea that you have that you think people can benefit from and that you can execute for them, float it out there, prepare yourself for the road ahead and make it happen.