Tag Archives: livingstone college

Internet Services Startup Launched By Three HBCUpreneurs – Who Have Never Met


“Great things in business are never done by one person. They’re done by a team of people.” – Steve Jobs

It is a business story worthy of Hollywood. Mainly because it seems to be a storyline that you only find in movies. However, the story is very real and very powerful. Not only because of its potential, but also because of the possibilities that it presents. Three HBCUpreneurs from three different HBCUs start a business, but have never actually met each other in person. The power of the internet, the power of Twitter and most importantly, the power of the HBCU community.

The company, HBCU Real Estate, is an internet services company that seeks to help the HBCU community (but not limited too) find and use HBCU real estate service providers. Everything from real estate agents, mortgage brokers, interior designers, and more. The founders hope that it will even lead to business creation in the spaces of real estate that the HBCU community may have little to no presence. HBCU Money is aware of only one title company* owned by an HBCU alumnus. HBCU Real Estate’s mission is to help facilitate circulation of the HBCU community’s dollars and keep them in the HBCU community. If successful, it could potentially keep tens of billions of dollars within the HBCU community. The fact that none of the founders have ever met in person makes what they are trying to accomplish even more astounding.

For two years it sat on the proverbial shelf according to organizer, cofounder, and HBCU Real Estate’s Director of Product Development, William A. Foster, IV, a Livingstone College, Virginia State University, and Prairie View A&M University alumnus. “I am a multipreneur and have learned that more hands and brains on deck is almost always a good thing. I needed to meet and find the right people who could understand, compliment, add value, and who could see the potential just as much as I could. Also, I promised myself no more solo projects. When you are involved in as many businesses and organizations as I am, being able to spread the load is vital to success – and sanity.”

Enter Christen Turner, Spelman College and Southern University alumnus, and Marcus King, an alumnus of Prairie View A&M University, both HBCUpreneurs themselves. Ms. Turner, HBCU Real Estate’s Chief Technology Officer, also owns Janelle T. Designs, a graphic designs firm, as well as Forever Femme, an accessories company. Mr. King, HBCU Real Estate’s Chief Marketing Officer, owns Hardly Home, a clothing line that is catered towards travel that was featured on HBCU Money’s The HBCUpreneur Corner in 2015. What does it say to you (King) about the potential of collaboration for HBCUpreneurs that 5 different HBCUs are represented among the 3 cofounders? King answered, “The motto at my alma maters is that “PV produces productive people” and I think that can be said about HBCUs across the board. For years HBCUs have been producing top talent and should continue to do so as we seek to move forward and provide solutions to the problems our community faces.”

The three have followed each other on Twitter for years, although no one can remember for how long. It was towards the end of 2020 that Foster said he approached Turner and King about doing a collaboration or tweeted at them rather. “I sent out a tweet and tagged both of them saying that I need to cofound something with the two of them. Having watched them over the years I knew we would click and have the same kind of work ethic. I just needed to find out if they thought the idea had any legs. If it was not this, it was going to be something else.” The work ethic was confirmed when he said he got an email from Turner on Thanksgiving while he himself was working. Turner further drove the point home of the potential of the moment, “This business will be successful because of two reasons, respect and trust. Despite not having met in an ‘official’ capacity, our partnership seems to have a natural fit to it; almost like pieces of a puzzle. With William’s intuition, he was able to unknowingly add the right people to his team who would each be able to add something different. Whether from a professional standpoint or specific personality traits, we all came in with an immediate respect for each other’s talents and skills. This is why the business will be successful. There’s no questioning; there’s only action, openness, and honesty.” Usually in Hollywood the movie ends with and they lived happily ever after – The End, but in this case it is clear that this is just The Beginning.

For more information, visit http://www.hbcurealestate.com

The Cultural Danger Of Covid-19: A Devolution Of Intellectual Progress


By William A. Foster, IV

“A man only learns in two ways, one by reading, and the other by association with smarter people.” – Will Rogers

I am rarely one who likes to write qualitative pieces over quantitative ones, but for the moment I am going to make an exception. I can give you numbers about how the economy is suffering and is going to continue to suffer for the foreseeable future. I could give you the number of cases, deaths, lack of PPE numbers, and percentage of overworked medical and essential workers. I could go on and on and on with numbers, I am economist after all, but here is the reality of all those numbers – they are bad, real bad, and will be bad for sometime to come. Instead, what I would like to discuss is an acute qualitative cultural loss we may potentially experience and perhaps give us an opportunity to think about what this very new world could look like that we are about to embark upon if we are not proactive in maintaining a core essence of our humanity.

The world we are entering will be far more online and far more physically distanced from each other both on a micro level and global macro one. Everything from work, school, and socializing. Many would argue that online college is the way of the future. This maybe true, but people forget one of the most critical components of college in person is the social aspect, the relationship building that simply can not currently be replicated online. A few decades ago, I was a freshmen at Livingstone College in Salisbury, NC and there I would meet my three best friends that I am sure will be that for the rest of my life. Our meeting was happenstance. None of us had the same major, personality, or interest. We called ourselves the Variety Pack because nothing about us was alike, but alas, we found each other, bonded, and formed a brotherhood that has stood the test of time. For all the differences of course, two of us did share the same Algebra/Trigonometry class. The class was an 8AM class and the pain of getting up for it when you are not a morning person can not be overstated in my case. However, myself and Rashad, the one of the said Variety Pack with whom I had the ungodly morning class with, loved to sit up and debate theology many nights. Rashad was/is a devout Christian. I on the other hand am something of a spiritual nomad you might say, but am fascinated by the intellectual aspect of religion. One particular night in our dorm hallway we got into one of our intense discussions and the hours clearly raced by because before we knew it the sun was rising. Sleep? Forget about it. We both agreed we would get ready and meet for breakfast and try our best to stay up through class. Moments like these and many more are what built our bond and there is simply no way to replace it online. People from different backgrounds meeting, sharing an experience, bonding, learning from each other, evolving, and developing their understanding of the world.

Simply put, COVID-19 has the potential of sending us back to the dark ages in terms of cultural evolution and development. Thousands of students who study abroad every year will no longer get to do so. Student exchanges, especially from China and Asia in general, will be looked at with heavy skepticism if considered at all. Americans, who are already known to be culturally hubris and inept, often failing to travel much and experience culture even within the United States will be even more isolated. Tourism and vacations that allow us to experience distant lands and bring back with us new ideas will be vastly reduced. Academic tourism for professors who may themselves spend time as visiting professors at different universities will be greatly hampered. Cultural developments like fusion cuisines from different parts of the world will retrench and much more will simply begin to deteriorate. The rise of intellectual incest, a term I use when someone or an institution is only receiving ideas from the same petri dish of thought. If a student receives all of their degrees for instance from the same institution, this would be an example of intellectual incest. Because the world is now going to shrink itself in an effort to protect itself, there is a unknown danger that may start to form. We have seen the world where people are exposed to different cultures, ideas, and ways of life and we have seen a world where people are isolated and xenophobia forms out of it.

The danger that we become a less tolerant, less compassionate, less understanding, and less intellectually evolved is a real possibility that could have far reaching societal implications for future generations. In a world where terroristic nationalism has been on the rise in far too many countries, COVID-19 may give many the “pass” they have been looking for to justify retrenching from a world that was evolving and developing towards efficiency of its intellect. Sharing best practices the world over is something we need more of and not less. This is by no means to say we were in Utopia. I do not believe in Utopia and not sure I would I enjoy living in it. Conflict has its place within measure in a society. Disagreement has its place within measure in a society. My Global Economic Environment professor, Dr. Catherine Mann, taught me years ago in business school that if you do not truly understand your opposition’s position, then you can not truly understand your own. To this day she is one of the most brilliant and wisest people I have ever met and there is an acute truth in what she said. How does one know their position is best if they have nothing to compare it with? Plan A maybe good, but an objective view of Plan B may allow it to have tweaks made to it that can make it great or perhaps it is Plan AB that is great. Without that engagement, we will be taking steps back in the interactions that create evolution and development of thought.

I am not sure when we will come out of this state we are in and I am not sure how we will be when we do. What I do know is that fear can drives even the fiercest animals into hiding and that fear for humans could undo hundreds of years of intellectual progress. Great ideas will become fewer and farther apart if that is true. The grand ideas of humanity like cleaning up pollution, reaching Mars and beyond, eliminating poverty, and so many more will take hundreds of years longer to accomplish than they otherwise would have. Yes, the world has forever changed and we will have to interact with each other differently, but make no mistake about it, we must continue to interact. Can you imagine a world where peanut butter never met jelly? Neither can I and I do not want too.

Donate To Every School In The CIAA/SIAC Challenge


How many HBCUs have you donated money too? Below are the jump pages for every CIAA/SIAC school and/or foundation’s giving page. We challenge HBCU alumni to give to their own and as many HBCUs as possible.

There are 25 HBCUs between the CIAA and SIAC with approximately 75,000 students. The two historic HBCU conferences cover a lot of geography from the Midwest to the Southeast and up the eastern coast.

Albany State University Give Now

Albany State University Foundation

Benedict College Give Now

Bowie State University Give Now

Bowie State University Foundation

Central State University Give Now

Central State University Foundation

Claflin University Give Now

Clark Atlanta University Give Now

Elizabeth City State University Give Now

Elizabeth City State University Foundation

Fayetteville State University Give Now

Fort Valley State University Give Now

Fort Valley State University Foundation

Johnson C. Smith University Give Now

Kentucky State University Give Now

Kentucky State University Foundation

Lane College Give Now

LeMoyne-Owen College Give Now

Lincoln University Give Now

The Lincoln Fund

Livingstone College Give Now

Miles College Give Now

Morehouse College Give Now

Paine College Give Now

Saint Augustine’s University Give Now

Savannah State University Give Now

Savannah State University Foundation

Tuskegee University Give Now

Virginia State University Give Now

Virginia State University Foundation

Virginia Union University Give Now

Winston-Salem State University Give Now

Winston-Salem State University Foundation

The HBCU Endowment Feature – Livingstone College


School Name: Livingstone College

Median Cost of Attendance: $22 050

Undergraduate Population: 1 140

Endowment Needed: $502 740 000

Analysis: Livingstone College needs approximately $500 million to allow all of its students to attend school debt free annually. For some perspective on this amount the largest donation ever given to an institution of higher education was by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore and his wife Betty, who donated $600 million to California Institute of Technology.

As with many small private HBCUs the school’s population is a problem for its endowment growth. A number of colleges and universities surveyed by U.S. News annually recently showed an annual alumni giving rate of 13.5 percent which means a small alumni base much of which has limited wealth is limited in its ability to contribute substantially. HBCUs in general usually having an alumni giving rate lower than the overall average. The mixture of limited wealth of African America and limited alumni population presents a challenge but also an opportunity.

Livingstone has the ability to have very intimate relationships with their alumni. Bringing all of the alumni into the gym for a speech during homecoming about giving and why it is important could go a long way for Livingstone. It is the only AME Zion four-year college which means its endowment should be growing at an exponentially faster rate than it has been given its monopoly on the 1.4 million members of the church. Unfortunately, the school is reported to only have a $1.5 million endowment or roughly 0.3 percent of the needed endowment. It would be interesting to know the percentage of AME Zion members who both attended the college and are sending their children to the college. Arguably, the population would be significantly larger if a deepening of the commitment by the church to the college were to take place on a number of strategic levels. Livingstone has some unique ingredients very few HBCUs have to grow its endowment and become a formidable liberal arts education institution but as oft is the case the question comes down to organizing a vision and leadership having the commitment to see it through.

As always it should be noted that endowments provide a myriad of subsidies to the university for everything from scholarship, faculty & administration salaries, research, and much more.