Monthly Archives: January 2014

The HBCU Money™ Weekly Market Watch


Our Money Matters /\ January 31, 2014

A weekly snapshot of African American owned public companies and HBCU Money™ tracked African stock exchanges.

NAME TICKER PRICE (GAIN/LOSS %)

African American Publicly Traded Companies

Citizens Bancshares Georgia (CZBS) $6.75 (8.87% UP)

M&F Bancorp (MFBP) $3.95 (2.60% UP)

Radio One (ROIA) $5.43 (3.63% UP)

African Stock Exchanges

Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM)  246.65 (0.77% DN)

Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE)  9 454.45 (0.05% DN)

Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE)  2 255.52 (3.40% UP)*

Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE)  134.66 (N/A)

Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) 45 132.10 (0.10% DN)

International Stock Exchanges

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) 9 967.65 (0.81% DN)

London Stock Exchange (LSE)  3 496.51 (0.38% DN)

Tokyo Stock Exchange (TOPIX)  1 220.64 (0.28% DN)

Commodities

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Currencies Of The African Diaspora – Cabo Verde


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The economy is service-oriented with commerce, transport, tourism, and public services accounting for about three-fourths of GDP. This island economy suffers from a poor natural resource base, including serious water shortages exacerbated by cycles of long-term drought and poor soil for agriculture on several of the islands. Although about 40% of the population lives in rural areas, the share of food production in GDP is low. About 82% of food must be imported. The fishing potential, mostly lobster and tuna, is not fully exploited. Cabo Verde annually runs a high trade deficit financed by foreign aid and remittances from its large pool of emigrants; remittances supplement GDP by more than 20%. Despite the lack of resources, sound economic management has produced steadily improving incomes. Continued economic reforms are aimed at developing the private sector and attracting foreign investment to diversify the economy and mitigate high unemployment. Future prospects depend heavily on the maintenance of aid flows, the encouragement of tourism, remittances, and the momentum of the government’s development program. Cabo Verde became a member of the WTO in July 2008.
 
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Source: Economy overview provided by CIA Factbook

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – The Firm: The Story of McKinsey and Its Secret Influence on American Business


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It ranks among the unquestioned laws of American big business over the last half century: If you want to be taken seriously, you hire McKinsey & Company.

FOUNDED IN 1926, McKINSEY CAN LAY CLAIM to the following partial list of accomplishments: its consultants have ushered in waves of structural, financial, and technological change to the nation’s best organizations; they remapped the power structure within the White House; they even revo­lutionized business schools. In this book, star financial journalist Duff McDonald shows just how, in becoming an indispensable part of decision making at the highest levels, McKinsey has done nothing less than set the course of American capitalism.

But he also answers the question that’s on the mind of anyone who has ever heard the word McKinsey: Are they worth it? After all, just as McKinsey can be shown to have helped invent most of the tools of modern management, the company was also involved with a number of striking failures. Its consultants were on the scene when General Motors drove itself into the ground, and they were Kmart’s advisers when the retailer tumbled into disarray. They played a critical role in building the bomb known as Enron.

McDonald is one of the few journalists to have not only parsed the record but also penetrated the culture of McKinsey itself—a corporate mandarin elite whose methods have been compared (by oth­ers and by themselves) to those of the Jesuits or the U.S. Marines. They feel so strongly about themselves that they have insisted on a proper noun where one need not exist. To an outsider, they are a consulting firm. To themselves, simply, The Firm. This revealing book uncovers the inner workings of what just might be the most influential private organization in America.

HBCU Money™ Dozen 1/20 – 1/24


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Did you miss HBCU Money™ Dozen via Twitter? No worry. We are now putting them on the site for you to visit at your leisure. We have made some changes here at HBCU Money™ Dozen. We are now solely focused on research and central bank articles from the previous week.

Research

Why yes, your laptop is watching you. What you need to know to protect yourself l CSOonline http://ow.ly/sW0Qy

Gmail Goes Down, Google Investigating the Cause l CIOonline http://trib.al/IPvck6J

Microsoft lawyer: Let customers decide country where cloud data is stored l NetworkWorld http://ow.ly/sW1kl

Research hints that nanotech could protect against heat in electronics, boosting computing power l Sandia Labs http://bit.ly/1htdnQR

Paradigm whiplash, anyone? “Stephen Hawking: ‘There are no black holes'” l Nature News http://bit.ly/1g9HgJj

Tech and telecom vendors spend millions on lobbying in DC l Computerworld http://ow.ly/sW1NP

Federal Reserve, Central Banks, & Financial Departments

Small towns’ survival may require borrowing a few ideas from the big city l St. Louis Fed http://bit.ly/KVnjHR

Chart shows number of jobs created by sector in Texas in 2013 l Dallas Fed http://bit.ly/1aTbngs

Video: How are students dealing with the growing burden of student loans? l St. Louis Fed http://bit.ly/19namMS

Fed continues to worry about banks that could crash the system l Housing Wire http://hwi.re/4mp6Ww

Why getting accurate data on global hunger poses a challenge l World Bank http://wrld.bg/sTjgc

How do we encourage entrepreneurship? We surveyed more than 1,000 entrepreneurs l World Economic Forum http://wef.ch/i3CXS

Thank you as always for joining us on Saturday for HBCU Money™ Dozen. The 12 most important research and finance articles of the week.

The HBCU Money™ Weekly Market Watch


Our Money Matters /\ January 24, 2014

A weekly snapshot of African American owned public companies and HBCU Money™ tracked African stock exchanges.

NAME TICKER PRICE (GAIN/LOSS %)

African American Publicly Traded Companies

Citizens Bancshares Georgia (CZBS) $6.16 (0.0o% UNCH)

M&F Bancorp (MFBP) $3.85 (0.00% UNCH)

Radio One (ROIA) $4.91 (1.80% DN)

African Stock Exchanges

Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM)  244.42 (1.21% UP)

Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE)  9 338.02 (0.02% UP)

Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE)  2 218.23 (3.40% UP)*

Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE)  140.57 (N/A)

Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) 46 462.14 (1.24% DN)

International Stock Exchanges

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) 10 096.34 (1.69% DN)

London Stock Exchange (LSE)  3 565.54 (1.61% DN)

Tokyo Stock Exchange (TOPIX)  1 264.60 (1.78% DN)

Commodities

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