Tag Archives: Economics

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man


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Featuring 15 explosive new chapters, this expanded edition of Perkins’s classic bestseller brings the story of economic hit men (EHMs) up to date and, chillingly, home to the US. Over 40 percent of the book is new, including chapters identifying today’s EHMs and a detailed chronology extensively documenting EHM activity since the first edition was published in 2004.

Former economic hit man John Perkins shares new details about the ways he and others cheated countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Then he reveals how the deadly EHM cancer he helped create has spread far more widely and deeply than ever in the US and everywhere else—to become the dominant system of business, government, and society today. Finally, he gives an insider view of what we each can do to change it.

Economic hit men are the shock troops of what Perkins calls the corporatocracy, a vast network of corporations, banks, colluding governments, and the rich and powerful people tied to them. If the EHMs can’t maintain the corrupt status quo through nonviolent coercion, the jackal assassins swoop in. The heart of this book is a completely new section, over 100 pages long, that exposes the fact that all the EHM and jackal tools—false economics, false promises, threats, bribes, extortion, debt, deception, coups, assassinations, unbridled military power—are used around the world today exponentially more than during the era Perkins exposed over a decade ago.

The material in this new section ranges from the Seychelles, Honduras, Ecuador, and Libya to Turkey, Western Europe, Vietnam, China, and, in perhaps the most unexpected and sinister development, the United States, where the new EHMs—bankers, lobbyists, corporate executives, and others—“con governments and the public into submitting to policies that make the rich richer and the poor poorer.”

But as dark as the story gets, this reformed EHM also provides hope. Perkins offers a detailed list of specific actions each of us can take to transform what he calls a failing Death Economy.

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The Finance & Tech Week In Review – 1/7/17


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Every Saturday the HBCU Money staff picks ten articles they were intrigued by and think you will enjoy for some weekend reading impacting finance and tech.

Mozambique’s poverty reduction was only half as fast as what Sub-Saharan Africa achieved.@WBPubs wrld.bg/fGUH307nxky

Is economics education failing?@wef wef.ch/2hXUMa2

These are the values shared by the most innovative companies@wef wef.ch/2i5cXKr

Climate change and growth risks@nberpubs bit.ly/2iZxJZh

Faster and cheaper than Concorde, meet the next-generation supersonic passenger jet@wef wef.ch/2jbYf0R

Your walk could be a password that connects devices on your body@newscientist ow.ly/6XK2307MkQn

Dell’s new laptop leaves the power cord in the past@nwtls ow.ly/vaj8307MkGZ

This robot can beat you at chess, then serve you coffee@CIOonline ow.ly/Xhph307Mkwc

Scar-free wound healing could be on its way@nwtls ow.ly/iNLh307Mks7

Baltimore Bike Share Arrives With 40% Electric Fleet@cleantechnica  ow.ly/GCKt307Mkjs

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic


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In Collective Courage, Jessica Gordon Nembhard chronicles African American cooperative business ownership and its place in the movements for Black civil rights and economic equality. Not since W. E. B. Du Bois’s 1907 Economic Co-operation Among Negro Americans has there been a full-length, nationwide study of African American cooperatives. Collective Courage extends that story into the twenty-first century. Many of the players are well known in the history of the African American experience: Du Bois, A. Philip Randolph and the Ladies’ Auxiliary to the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, Nannie Helen Burroughs, Fannie Lou Hamer, Ella Jo Baker, George Schuyler and the Young Negroes’ Co-operative League, the Nation of Islam, and the Black Panther Party. Adding the cooperative movement to Black history results in a retelling of the African American experience, with an increased understanding of African American collective economic agency and grassroots economic organizing.

To tell the story, Gordon Nembhard uses a variety of newspapers, period magazines, and journals; co-ops’ articles of incorporation, minutes from annual meetings, newsletters, budgets, and income statements; and scholarly books, memoirs, and biographies. These sources reveal the achievements and challenges of Black co-ops, collective economic action, and social entrepreneurship. Gordon Nembhard finds that African Americans, as well as other people of color and low-income people, have benefitted greatly from cooperative ownership and democratic economic participation throughout the nation’s history.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – War! What Is It Good For?: Conflict and the Progress of Civilization


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A powerful and provocative exploration of how war has changed our society–for the better

“War! . . . . / What is it good for? / Absolutely nothing,” says the famous song–but archaeology, history, and biology show that war in fact has been good for something. Surprising as it sounds, war has made humanity safer and richer.

In War! What Is It Good For?, the renowned historian and archaeologist Ian Morris tells the gruesome, gripping story of fifteen thousand years of war, going beyond the battles and brutality to reveal what war has really done to and for the world. Stone Age people lived in small, feuding societies and stood a one-in-ten or even one-in-five chance of dying violently. In the twentieth century, by contrast–despite two world wars, Hiroshima, and the Holocaust–fewer than one person in a hundred died violently. The explanation: War, and war alone, has created bigger, more complex societies, ruled by governments that have stamped out internal violence. Strangely enough, killing has made the world safer, and the safety it has produced has allowed people to make the world richer too.

War has been history’s greatest paradox, but this searching study of fifteen thousand years of violence suggests that the next half century is going to be the most dangerous of all time. If we can survive it, the age-old dream of ending war may yet come to pass. But, Morris argues, only if we understand what war has been good for can we know where it will take us next.

Federal Reserve’s 2014 Economic Household Well Being Report


KEY FINDINGS

  • Sixty-five percent of respondents report that their families are either “doing okay” or “living comfortably” financially, compared to 62 percent in 2013.
  • Forty-seven percent of respondents say they either could not cover an emergency expense costing $400, or would cover it by selling something or borrowing money.
  • Twenty percent of respondents report that their spending exceeded their income in the 12 months prior to the survey.
  • Sixty percent of respondents indicate they are either somewhat or very confident they would be approved for a mortgage if they were to apply.
  • Among respondents who borrowed for their own education, those who failed to complete an associate degree or bachelor’s degree, those who attended for-profit institutions, and those who were firstgeneration college students are more likely to be behind on their payments than others.

FULL REPORT CLICK HERE