Tag Archives: real estate

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Building Wealth One House at a Time


Make your first million and earn a steady income with this updated, essential guide to real estate investing

The collapse in real estate prices from 2007 through 2012 was the most significant event in the real estate industry since the Great Depression. But today, with the real estate market rebounding, a new generation of investors is entering the field, eager to make their fortune.

Building Wealth One House at a Time, 2nd Edition provides you with a practical way to create wealth through an ethical approach of buying, financing, and managing property. Renowned real estate expert John W. Schaub takes you through his 9-step program and explains how to accumulate one million dollars’ worth of houses debt free in any market, while earning a steady cash flow.

This invaluable guide presents fresh strategies for buying and financing property, reflected in six new chapters on topics such as real estate cycles, financing real estate purchases, negotiation techniques, and retirement investing.

You’ll learn how to:

• Finance real estate purchases without going to a bank
• Recognize and capitalize on real estate cycles
• Improve your negotiation skills in any situation
• Avoid common and costly mistakes
• Create cash flow that lasts forever, and much more

Building Wealth One House at a Time, 2nd Edition reveals how virtually anyone can accumulate houses debt free and earn an income for life.

The Highest Paying Dividend Index ETFs For Your 2017 Portfolio – Sector By Sector


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Investing can be a daunting affair for first timers or newbies and yes, even experts, but the rise of ETFs (exchange traded funds) have made the access to traditionally expensive mutual funds much easier to secure for those with smaller accounts or limited investment knowledge. How can I be invested while reducing my risk? This both a financial question and a knowledge one. We believe the answer is to own every sector through an index ETF. Indexes are passively managed, meaning they are set and left to the fundamentals of the markets and economies they serve. These index ETFs usually have much cheaper expense ratios because of their passive management making it easier for investors, beginners and experts alike, to not see their gains eaten away by inundated fees often tacked on by active managers. There is now enough research after decades of tracking to show by the likes of John Bogle, founder of Vanguard, and others in the passively managed space that index ETFs and mutual funds far outperform their actively managed counterparts.

On top of that, there is the consideration of dividend or investment income. Dividends are money paid out by companies usually on a quarterly basis from a company’s ongoing operating income. It should be noted that not all companies pay dividends. However, in ETFs because they hold a myriad of companies there is a higher probability that there will be dividends present. Dividends help households reduce the income risk of job loss. This is how many wealthy households even during recessions are able to maintain and how many pay far less in taxes. Of the three incomes (earned, passive, investment), it is earned income, or the income we get up and go to work for everyday that is taxed at the highest rate. No matter how much you earn, your dividend tax rate is never above 20 percent versus a high of almost 40 percent in earned income tax rate, so more income from dividends is always advantageous.

Our list was calculated by taking the three lowest expense ratios of ETFs by sector according to the website ETF Database’s screener. Once those were identified we looked at the dividend yield that each ETF was paying and subtracted the expense ratio. This would appear in a calculation as nominal dividend yield minus expense ratio equals real dividend yield and there would be our winner for 2017. It should be noted that dividends are not fixed and companies can reduce or increase them as they sit fit, usually based on a company’s financial health.

You can buy this list and know that you are well diversified across every sector of the economy and will be receiving dividend payments along the way. If you really want to simply things, just head over to the Motif Investing platform and buy the All-Sector ETF of ETFs Motif, which is each of these ETFs below in one security and constructed by HBCU Money. Click here to find out more.

BASIC MATERIALS

Ticker Symbol: XLB

Issuer: State Street

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 1.80%

Annual Dividend: $0.97 / share

consumer goods

Ticker Symbol: FSTA

Issuer: Fidelity

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 2.45%

Annual Dividend: $0.79 / share

financial

Ticker Symbol: FNCL

Issuer: Fidelity

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 1.73%

Annual Dividend: $0.63 / share

healthcare

Ticker Symbol: XLV

Issuer: State Street

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 1.45%

Annual Dividend: $1.11 / share

industrial goods

Ticker Symbol: XLI

Issuer: State Street

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 1.92%

Annual Dividend: $1.29 / share

services

Ticker Symbol: XLY

Issuer: State Street

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 1.56%

Annual Dividend: $1.39 / share

technology

Ticker Symbol: XLK

Issuer: State Street

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 1.61%

Annual Dividend: $0.84 / share

utilities (tIE)

Ticker Symbol: XLU

Issuer: State Street

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 3.27%

Annual Dividend: $1.66 / share

Ticker Symbol: FUTY

Issuer: Fidelity

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 3.27%

Annual Dividend: $1.06 / share

real estate

Ticker Symbol: VNQ

Issuer: Vanguard

Real Annual Dividend Yield: 4.70%

Annual Dividend: $3.98 / share

Disclaimer: This article is in no way financial or investment advice. Each person’s investment and tax needs vary. Please consult your financial adviser or CPA before making any decisions. HBCU Money, its staff, or ownership has no holdings in any of the aforementioned investments. 

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Professional Real Estate Development


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This basic primer covers the nuts and bolts of developing all types of real estate, including multifamily, office, retail, and industrial projects. Thoroughly updated, this new edition includes numerous case studies of actual projects as well as small-scale examples that are ideal for anyone new to real estate development.

Buy Mediterranean Before Boardwalk: Real Estate Investment Lessons From Monopoly


Real estate investing, even on a very small scale, remains a tried and true means of building an individual’s cash flow and wealth. – Robert Kiyosaki

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For all those who have played Monopoly at anytime in life there is one thing for certain, Boardwalk holds an allure that most players simply can not resist. Me and my former roommate would often play the game and on the first few trips around the board as players are snatching up everything they land on, it became apparent to me that I was getting cash poor quickly and so was she. There was no liquidity strategy for either of us. I decided to change my approach and the key to that approach was to not buy Park Place or Boardwalk unless I needed to defensively prevent her from obtaining a monopoly. Even if she had obtained one of the properties I may not buy the other depending on her cash position. A tip in Monopoly, keep your money under the table.

boardwalk

The great sin of Monopoly and many beginner real estate investors is that they do not actually purview the reality of what they are starting with in relation to what they will potentially be buying during the game. Each Monopoly player starts with $1 500. Just a quick examination of why Boardwalk makes no sense for a period of time is that it cost $400 or almost 27 percent of your starting cash position. On each trip around the monopoly board there is a 2.5 percent chance you land on any one square. It would take your competition eight trips around the board before your property paid you back landing on it every single time just to get that money back. Now, let us say you get lucky and land Park Place as well, that is $750 or half your starting cash position to land the Ritz Carlton and Fifth Avenue equivalent. The problem is to get any true value out of them you need to develop them. To get them up to hotel level you first have to build four houses on each which are $200 a piece and then finally a hotel. You can not just build on one property in Monopoly. So if you put one on Boardwalk, then you have to put one on Park Place next. To get both properties up to hotel level it cost $2 000 or 10 trips around the board. In exchange, both properties now give you a 5 percent chance of landing rental income of $3 500. On the flip side, if you were to buy all five “cheap” properties of Mediterranean, Baltic, Oriental, Vermont, and Connecticut and develop them up to hotel level it would cost you $1 690 and give you a 12.5 percent chance for $2 400 in rental income. Again, think about where you are starting. In comparison, you gave up half your cash position to acquire Park Place and Boardwalk, and then need to circle the board at least seven more times to get to hotel level. Whereas for MBOVC properties, you can acquire and build all of them with your starting cash and one trip around the board. By the PPB owner’s sixth trip, you have had the potential of generating $14 400 in rental income at over twice the opportunity that they have, and in the process they will be potentially cash strapped. You on the other hand, just on passing go six times will have accumulated $1 200 in income, not including potential rental gains.

mediterraneanavenue

So how does this play out in the real world? Many start up real estate investors are just not honest with themselves. They want to buy properties that endanger their cash position and not add to it. There are really two types of investment properties in real estate regardless of whether it is commercial or residential; they are cash flow or appreciation. Cash flow properties tend to be the MBOVC properties. They offer little in the way of appreciation, but kick off enormous amounts of cash. On the flip side, PPB are appreciation properties, meaning the cash flow on them will be tight (maybe negative), but over the long-term the property will rise appreciably in value. The problem with the latter for start up real estate investors is that nothing can go wrong. Razor thin margins (if any) means that maintenance and repairs are all coming out of your pocket instead of the properties revenues. In a cash flow property you are looking to keep it standing and functional as opposed to a Miss Universe competition. As such, even basic repairs and maintenance can be kept up with the revenues of the property because of the acute profit margins.

So what are MBOVC properties? It is all relative to your own starting cash position. Things you should keep in mind are how much is your current income, financing options, down payments, estimated repairs and ongoing maintenance, and taxes. In essence, these are properties that will not strain your cash position and have high profit margins. If you can purchase and repair the property and still have a 100 percent profit margin, then that is the bulls eye. Often these are properties that have Section 8 potential or Class D multifamily properties. The latter are usually in low-income and working class areas where tenants have higher eviction rates, more likely to pay rent in cash/money order, and where maintaining a quality standard of the property will not be costly.

Given the rise of renters in the United States with credit still very tight for potential home buyers’, there is a sweet spot available for investors who can offer affordable housing, especially among millennials saddled with student loan debt. Les Christie of CNN Money reports, “The median rent for all types of rental homes hit $1,350 a month in March (2014), up from a median of $1,285 a month 12 months ago, Trulia reported.” You may have to search smaller towns with growing demographics or areas of the big city that are hidden gems, but still offer an affordable purchase option. Thinking outside of the box of where you purchase your rental properties is key. It may be in a small town in Arkansas, but wherever it is be sure you do your homework and not be afraid to take on a project.

sony

Cash is king, as my entrepreneurship teacher Charles Reed would always say and without it you are out of oxygen in business. In Monopoly, I would often buy the red, yellow, and green properties, but would not build on them unless someone landed on my MBOVC properties. This allowed me to grow and keep my cash position sound in case I had landed on someone else’s property. These lessons are the same I am applying to my rental property portfolio. Maybe one day I will own or build a Boardwalk property like the NYC Sony Building (pictured above) where a triplex in the building is on the market for a record $150 million and probably would fetch easily $800 000 to $1 million per month in rental income. Monopoly, it is just a game, but take heed to its lessons and you may just win in real life.

 

HBCU Money™ Dozen 2/16 – 2/20


high-noon

Did you miss HBCU Money™ Dozen via Twitter? No worry. We are now putting them on the site for you to visit at your leisure. We have made some changes here at HBCU Money™ Dozen. We are now solely focused on research and central bank articles from the previous week.

Research

The On-Demand Economy: Entrepreneurship or Exploitation? l CIOonline http://trib.al/7url4LE

New research suggests new rules for nanosized ensemble behavior l Argonne http://1.usa.gov/1MygGXJ

Just 70,000 years ago this star buzzed right past our solar system l New Scientist http://ow.ly/JmdLu

Citizen scientists dive into particle physics and astrophysics research l Symmetry http://ow.ly/Jmelr

Spy agencies hacked SIM card maker’s encryption l Computerworld http://ow.ly/Jmew0

How a university’s data center overhaul makes a green impact l Network World http://bit.ly/1Dv2fAV

Federal Reserve, Central Banks, & Financial Departments

Can Tunisia become a hub for entrepreneurs? l World Bank http://wrld.bg/Jl1EL

Which are the top cities for real estate investment? l World Economic Forum http://wef.ch/1ydCOfk

What size firm has created most jobs in the recovery? l St. Louis Fed http://bit.ly/1DwJwFa

5 lessons on microfinance from women in Latin America l World Economic Forum http://wef.ch/1A8RTEh

What causes changes in consumer sentiment, or “animal spirits,” that drive the business cycle? l SF Fed http://bit.ly/1ySuj9R

Since 1990, the share of household budgets going to education hasn’t risen much, if at all l St. Louis Fed http://bit.ly/1zE8ta3

Thank you as always for joining us on Saturday for HBCU Money™ Dozen. The 12 most important research and finance articles of the week.