Tag Archives: creativity

The Finance & Tech Week In Review – 5/13/17


Every Saturday the HBCU Money staff picks ten articles they were intrigued by and think you will enjoy for some weekend reading impacting finance and tech.

NASA pushes back first Orion manned mission / New Atlas  

How can humans obtain an omega-3-rich human diet from sustainable sources? / Pew Environment http://ow.ly/Td2a30bIqnR

Android smartphones: Which one is right for you? | Computerworld http://ow.ly/C2M330bIqr0

New ransomware Jaff demands $3,700 payments / CIOonline http://ow.ly/85uq30bIqu1

A milestone for computers in China / Futurism http://ow.ly/160030bIqys

How to manage self-motivated and highly intelligent workers / WEF 

Born to lead? The effect of birth order on non-cognitive abilities / NBER  

Why creativity will drive the next industrial revolution / WEF 

Our researcher examines how small banks deal with large shocks, such as natural disasters / Cleveland Fed 

The 21st-century skills every student needs / WEF 

 

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HBCU Money™ Dozen 4/6 – 4/10


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Did you miss HBCU Money™ Dozen via Twitter? No worry. We are now putting them on the site for you to visit at your leisure. We have made some changes here at HBCU Money™ Dozen. We are now solely focused on research and central bank articles from the previous week.

Research

Finding out your newborn’s genetic fate could soon be reality. So could these moral dilemmas l New Scientist ow.ly/LpZag

IBM, Fujifilm show tape storage still has a long future l CIOonline trib.al/GO03jyq

Healthy oceans need sharks: The Shark Stanley’s new book l Pew Environment bit.ly/1JsL0Ae

Carbon Markets Could Soon Cover Half of North America’s Population l Clean Technica dlvr.it/9KNM9n

US challenges China in supercomputing race with 180-petaflop system l Computerworld ow.ly/LpZwj

New York state has 1,744 MW of wind capacity, an increase of 3,500% since 2005 l Renewable Cities ow.ly/LpZFX

Federal Reserve, Central Banks, & Financial Departments

Investing in public transit now can help cities avoid a high-carbon future l World Bank wrld.bg/LinoK

Could DNA from a mother’s bacteria be making its way into the genes of her offspring? l World Economic Forum wef.ch/1NaaNxo

Lack of access to surgical care accounts for a significant portion of the global disease burden l World Bank wrld.bg/LouoI

Can you teach creativity? l World Economic Forum wef.ch/1HvdDuQ

Asian families are catching up to (and in some measurements, have surpassed) white families l St. Louis Fed bit.ly/1CYZOnX

Why science says it’s a good idea to keep a diary l World Economic Forum wef.ch/1LRSBNB

Thank you as always for joining us on Saturday for HBCU Money™ Dozen. The 12 most important research and finance articles of the week.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Idea Man: A Memoir by the Cofounder of Microsoft


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“The entire conversation took five minutes. When it was over, Bill and I looked at each other. It was one thing to talk about writing a language for a microprocessor and another to get the job done….If we’d been older or known better, Bill and I might have been put off by the task in front of us. But we were young and green enough to believe that we just might pull it off.”

Paul Allen, best known as the cofounder of Microsoft, has left his mark on numerous fields, from aviation and science to rock ‘n’ roll, professional sports, and philanthropy. His passions and curiosity have transformed the way we live. In 2007 and again in 2008, Time named him one of the hundred most influential people in the world.

It all started on a snowy day in December 1974, when he was twenty-one years old. After buying the new issue of Popular Electronics in Harvard Square, Allen ran to show it to his best friend from Seattle, Bill Gates, then a Harvard undergrad. The magazine’s cover story featured the Altair 8800, the first true personal computer; Allen knew that he and Gates had the skills to code a programming language for it. When Gates agreed to collaborate on BASIC for the Altair, one of the most influential partnerships in the digital era was up and running.

While much has been written about Microsoft’s early years, Allen has never before told the story from his point of view. Nor has he previously talked about the details of his complex relationship with Gates or his behind-closed-doors perspective on how a struggling start-up became the most powerful technology company in the world. Idea Man is the candid and long-awaited memoir of an intensely private person, a tale of triumphant highs and terrifying lows.

After becoming seriously ill with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 1982, Allen began scaling back his involvement with Microsoft. He recovered and started using his fortune—and his ideas—for a life of adventure and discovery, from the first privately funded spacecraft (SpaceShipOne) to a landmark breakthrough in neuroscience (the Allen Brain Atlas). His eclectic ventures all begin with the same simple question: What should exist? As Allen has written:

To me, that’s the most exciting question imaginable….From technology to science to music to art, I’m inspired by those who’ve blurred the boundaries, who’ve looked at the possibilities, and said, “What if…?” In my own work, I’ve tried to anticipate what’s coming over the horizon, to hasten its arrival, and to apply it to people’s lives in a meaningful way…The varied possibilities of the universe have dazzled me since I was a child, and they continue to drive my work, my investments, and my philanthropy.

Idea Man is an astonishing true story of ideas made real.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative


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In this extensively revised and updated version of his bestselling classic, Out of Our Minds, Ken Robinson offers a groundbreaking approach to understanding creativity in education and in business. He argues that people and organizations everywhere are dealing with problems that originate in schools and universities and that many people leave education with no idea at all of their real creative abilities. Out of Our Minds is a passionate and powerful call for radically different approaches to leadership, teaching and professional development to help us all to meet the extraordinary challenges of living and working in the 21st century.