Tag Archives: china

The Finance & Tech Week In Review – 5/13/17


Every Saturday the HBCU Money staff picks ten articles they were intrigued by and think you will enjoy for some weekend reading impacting finance and tech.

NASA pushes back first Orion manned mission / New Atlas  

How can humans obtain an omega-3-rich human diet from sustainable sources? / Pew Environment http://ow.ly/Td2a30bIqnR

Android smartphones: Which one is right for you? | Computerworld http://ow.ly/C2M330bIqr0

New ransomware Jaff demands $3,700 payments / CIOonline http://ow.ly/85uq30bIqu1

A milestone for computers in China / Futurism http://ow.ly/160030bIqys

How to manage self-motivated and highly intelligent workers / WEF 

Born to lead? The effect of birth order on non-cognitive abilities / NBER  

Why creativity will drive the next industrial revolution / WEF 

Our researcher examines how small banks deal with large shocks, such as natural disasters / Cleveland Fed 

The 21st-century skills every student needs / WEF 

 

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HBCU Money™ Dozen 11/16 – 11/20


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Did you miss HBCU Money™ Dozen via Twitter? No worry. We are now putting them on the site for you to visit at your leisure. We have made some changes here at HBCU Money™ Dozen. We are now solely focused on research and central bank articles from the previous week.

Research

300-Mile Electric Bentley Planned…For ~2020 l Clean Technica http://dlvr.it/CnrQvm

If Our Capitalist Overlords Love Clean Power, Who Could Hate It? l Clean Technica http://dlvr.it/CnrL2Z

MAP: Countries around the world enforcing new shark protections l Pew Environment http://pew.org/1Nu5T37

Collaboration is key to security – worldwide l CSOonline http://bit.ly/1lyyglh

10 essential Mac utilities l Macworld http://dlvr.it/CnqDY8

Novel tool use. Capuchin monkeys use sticks as shovels to dig out caiman eggs l New Scientist http://ow.ly/UT7at

Federal Reserve, Central Banks, & Financial Departments

More frequent household surveys in poorest countries can close #data gaps l World Bank http://wrld.bg/UJ4Ns

Mobile subscriptions now outnumber people in the world l World Economic Forum http://wef.ch/1kJZK7k

Three critical factors driving wealth accumulation l NBER http://bit.ly/1MWeASw

The probability of a hard landing in China is no higher today than it was earlier this year l St. Louis Fed http://bit.ly/1T3EN2q

Long-term unemployment increased disproportionately for older women after the Great Recession l St. Louis Fed http://bit.ly/1MTafLx

How are #smartphones affecting your relationships? l World Economic Forum http://wef.ch/1SNomHw

Thank you as always for joining us on Saturday for HBCU Money™ Dozen. The 12 most important research and finance articles of the week.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – China’s Second Continent: Building a New Empire in Africa


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An exciting, hugely revealing account of China’s burgeoning presence in Africa—a developing empire already shaping, and reshaping, the future of millions of people.

A prizewinning foreign correspondent and former New York Times bureau chief in Shanghai and in West and Central Africa, Howard French is uniquely positioned to tell the story of China in Africa. Through meticulous on-the-ground reporting—conducted in Mandarin, French, and Portuguese, among other languages—French crafts a layered investigation of astonishing depth and breadth as he engages not only with policy-shaping moguls and diplomats, but also with the  ordinary men and women navigating the street-level realities of cooperation, prejudice, corruption, and opportunity forged by this seismic geopolitical development. With incisiveness and empathy, French reveals the human face of China’s economic, political, and human presence across the African continent—and in doing so reveals what is at stake for everyone involved.

We meet a broad spectrum of China’s dogged emigrant population, from those singlehandedly reshaping African infrastructure, commerce, and even environment (a self-made tycoon who harnessed Zambia’s now-booming copper trade; a timber entrepreneur determined to harvest the entirety of Liberia’s old-growth redwoods), to those just barely scraping by (a sibling pair running small businesses despite total illiteracy; a karaoke bar owner–cum–brothel madam), still convinced that Africa affords them better opportunities than their homeland. And we encounter an equally panoramic array of African responses: a citizens’ backlash in Senegal against a “Trojan horse” Chinese construction project (a tower complex to be built over a beloved soccer field, which locals thought would lead to overbearing Chinese pressure on their economy); a Zambian political candidate who, having protested China’s intrusiveness during the previous election and lost, now turns accommodating; the ascendant middle class of an industrial boomtown; African mine workers bitterly condemning their foreign employers, citing inadequate safety precautions and wages a fraction of their immigrant counterparts’.

French’s nuanced portraits reveal the paradigms forming around this new world order, from the all-too-familiar echoes of colonial ambition—exploitation of resources and labor; cut-rate infrastructure projects; dubious treaties—to new frontiers of cultural and economic exchange, where dichotomies of suspicion and trust, assimilation and isolation, idealism and disillusionment are in dynamic flux.

Part intrepid travelogue, part cultural census, part industrial and political exposé, French’s keenly observed account ultimately offers a fresh perspective on the most pressing unknowns of modern Sino-African relations: why China is making the incursions it is, just how extensive its cultural and economic inroads are, what Africa’s role in the equation is, and just what the ramifications for both parties—and the watching world—will be in the foreseeable future.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China


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A vibrant, colorful, and revelatory inner history of China during a moment of profound transformation

From abroad, we often see China as a caricature: a nation of pragmatic plutocrats and ruthlessly dedicated students destined to rule the global economy—or an addled Goliath, riddled with corruption and on the edge of stagnation. What we don’t see is how both powerful and ordinary people are remaking their lives as their country dramatically changes.

As the Beijing correspondent for The New Yorker, Evan Osnos was on the ground in China for years, witness to profound political, economic, and cultural upheaval. In Age of Ambition, he describes the greatest collision taking place in that country: the clash between the rise of the individual and the Communist Party’s struggle to retain control. He asks probing questions: Why does a government with more success lifting people from poverty than any civilization in history choose to put strict restraints on freedom of expression? Why do millions of young Chinese professionals—fluent in English and devoted to Western pop culture—consider themselves “angry youth,” dedicated to resisting the West’s influence? How are Chinese from all strata finding meaning after two decades of the relentless pursuit of wealth?
Writing with great narrative verve and a keen sense of irony, Osnos follows the moving stories of everyday people and reveals life in the new China to be a battleground between aspiration and authoritarianism, in which only one can prevail.