Tag Archives: business

The Finance & Tech Week In Review – 1/14/17


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Every Saturday the HBCU Money staff picks ten articles they were intrigued by and think you will enjoy for some weekend reading impacting finance and tech.

  • How will we power the planet without wrecking the climate? / Nova PBS to.pbs.org/2jNIxx1
  • Small businesses are prime targets for cyberattacks: SIEM-as-a-service can help / CIO Online ow.ly/13Te307ZH8Z
  • Mini fire extinguishers inside lithium batteries may stop blazes / New Scientist bit.ly/2im4hjc
  • Harvester ants farm by planting seeds to eat once they germinate / New Scientist bit.ly/2im9Y0M
  • Here’s how much Tesla will require EV owners to pay to charge up / CIO Online ow.ly/qsm1307ZGKf
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HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business


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In The Power of Habit, Pulitzer Prize–winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential. At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, being more productive, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. As Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – African Americans in Business (From Emancipation to Civil Rights)


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Many people dream of owning their own business or making it to the top of the corporate ladder. In the pages of this book, you’ll meet African Americans who overcame obstacles and stereotypes to make their dreams a reality. Madam C. J. Walker was orphaned at age 7, married at 14, became a mother at 18, and was widowed at 20. She went on make a million dollars selling hair care products. Berry Gordy loved music but went broke after opening a record store. He didn’t give up, though. Gordy eventually started Motown Records, which became one of the country’s most successful record labels and introduced a host of talented black artists to mainstream American audiences. Stanley O’Neal grew up on a farm without running water or indoor toilets. Through intelligence and hard work he became the head of a $50 billion investment bank. Read about these and other inspiring figures in this book.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – The Negro As Capitalist


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A study of the efforts of the Black community to provide for itself those banking services often denied it by the white financial community._”An absorbing and thoroughly documented account, the book merits close study not only by those who are specialists in the field of banking but also by those who are interested in the economic plight of the Negro.”

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – The African American Entrepreneur: Then and Now


 

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African American entrepreneurship has been an integral part of the American economy since the 1600s. On the eve of the Civil War, the collective wealth of free blacks was approximately $50 million. In 2006, African Americans earned a whopping $744 billion, a figure that exceeds the gross domestic product of all but 15 nations of the 192 independent countries in the world. As W. Sherman Rogers so ably demonstrates, African Americans have achieved these economic gains under difficult circumstances. Slavery, segregation, and legally limited access to property, education, and other opportunities have taken a heavy toll, even to this day. Besides providing a penetrating glimpse into the world of black entrepreneurship both past and present, this book urges African Americans to gain financial independence as entrepreneurs. Business ownership, Rogers argues, will bring security, wealth that can be passed to successive generations, and educated offspring with much greater earning power.

The African American Entreprenuer: Then and NoW</i> explores the lower economic status of black Americans in light of America’s legacy of slavery, segregation, and rampant discrimination. Its main purpose is to shine a light on the legal, historical, sociological and political factors that together help to explain the economic condition of black people in America from their arrival in America to the present. In the process, the book spotlights the many amazing breakthroughs made by black entrepreneurs even before the Civil War and Emancipation. Profiles of business people from the Post-civil War period through today include Booker T. Washington, pioneer banker and insurer A.G. Gaston, hair care entrepreneur Madame C.J. Walker, Ebony publisher John H. Johnson, Black Entertainment Television founder Robert L. Johnson, publisher Earl Graves, music producer Damon Dash, rapper Sean Combs, former basketball stars Dave Bing and Magic Johnson, food entrepreneur Michelle Hoskins, broadcast personality Cathy Hughes, former Beatrice Foods head Reginald Lewis, Oprah Winfrey, and many more. As Rogers points out, reading about remarkable African American entrepreneurs can inspire readers to adopt an entrepreneurial mindset. To further that goal and help readers take the plunge, he outlines many of the skills, tools and information necessary for business success-success that can help chart a new path to prosperity for all African Americans.