Tag Archives: ethiopia

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Ethiopia: A Post-Cold War African State


When the oppressive Marxist-Leninst dictatorship of the Derg collapsed in 1991, there was hope that a new era might begin for a democratic Ethiopia. However, backed by the United States, the Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Front established a government that would not share power. Instead of a transition to democracy, the EPRF denied opposition parties meaningful participation in elections, violated human rights, and intensified ethnic distrust among the people. According to critics, repressions of the government are on a scale equivalent to those of the world’s worst dictatorships. Vestal examines the plight of the Ethiopian people and counters questionable government pronouncements. He concludes with suggestions for a revised U.S. policy toward Ethiopia and for peaceful negotiations between the government and its political opposition to develop a more democratic approach.

Ethiopia, an African nation with close ties to the United States dating from World War II, is a troubled land. When the oppressive Marxist-Leninist dictatorship of the Derg collapsed in 1991, there was hope that a new era might begin for a democratic Ethiopia. However, backed by the U.S., the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front established a government that would not share power. Instead of a transition to democracy, the EPRDF denied opposition parties meaningful participation in elections, violated human rights, and intensified ethnic distrust among the people.

According to critics, repressions of the government are on a scale equivalent to those of the world’s worst dictatorships. Vestal examines the plight of the Ethiopian people and counters questionable government pronouncements. He concludes with suggestions for a revised U.S. policy toward Ethiopia and for peaceful negotiations between the government and its political opposition to develop a more democratic approach.

Advertisements

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Eritrea and Ethiopia: From Conflict To Cooperation


Eritrea and Ethiopia have the best potential to start the great movement to create a stable, peaceful and cooperative order in the Horn of Africa, if only because the two have, even during the last three dark decades of forced and unhappy partnership, developed a rudimentary economic relationship that ties them together which can, with a little restructuring, be geared to mutual advantage. It is proposed that Eritrea and Ethiopia constitute a core in a Horn of Africa system. If we accept that, and the additional proposal that the Horn of Africa itself forms a distinct system in international relations, then relations within the core, and indeed the larger system, must be premised on the shift from one type of integration to another — i. e. from the hegemonism of empire to free association in a political community. A fully integrated community can be achieved only upon the acceptance of a pluralistic integration process. This collection of essays addresses the prospects and problems in the process of creating a single, integrated community in the Horn of Africa. — Midwest Book Review