List of Sequester Cuts Per HBCU State


“The sequester is like taking a meat-axe to federal spending.” – Republican Congressman and Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John Boehner
meat-axe
 
The sequester cuts are set to take effect on March 1, 2013. A state by state analysis of the cuts impact on each state was recently released by the White House. HBCU states are listed below in alphabetical order.
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ALABAMA

Teachers and schools

Alabama will lose approximately $11 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 150 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 21,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 40 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Alabama will lose approximately $9 million in funds for about 110 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 940 fewer low income students in Alabama would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 280 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,100 children in Alabama, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Alabama would lose about $2 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Alabama could lose another $1 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Alabama, approximately 27,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $176.9 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $91 million in Alabama. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Alabama would be cut by about $8 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Alabama will lose about $230,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Alabama will lose about $472,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 16,600 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 500 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Alabama around 2,110 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $144,000.

Public health

Alabama will lose approximately $457,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Alabama will lose about $1,180,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 1,600 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Alabama State Department of Public Health will lose about $165,000 resulting in around 4,100 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Alabama could lose up to $102,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 400 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Alabama would lose approximately $865,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

ARKANSAS

Teachers and schools

Arkansas will lose approximately $5.9 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 80 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 10,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 30 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Arkansas will lose approximately $5.6 million in funds for about 70 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 380 fewer low income students in Arkansas would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 110 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 600 children in Arkansas, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Arkansas would lose about $1.6 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Arkansas could lose another $842,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Arkansas, approximately 4,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $19.2 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $1.6 million in Arkansas. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Arkansas would be cut by about $2 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Arkansas will lose about $159,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Arkansas will lose about $273,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 9,850 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 200 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Arkansas around 1,140 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $78,000.

Public health

Arkansas will lose approximately $279,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Arkansas will lose about $660,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 200 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Arkansas State Department of Health will lose about $84,000 resulting in around 2,100 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Arkansas could lose up to $62,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 200 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Arkansas would lose approximately $310,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

CALIFORNIA

Teachers and schools

California will lose approximately $87.6 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 1,210 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 187,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 320 fewer schools would receive funding.In addition, California will lose approximately $62.9 million in funds for about 760 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 9,600 fewer low income students in California would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 3,690 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 8,200 children in California, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

California would lose about $12.4 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, California could lose another $1.9 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In California, approximately 64,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $399.4 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $54 million in California. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in California would be cut by about $15 million. Navy: Maintenance and repair of 5 ships in San Diego and aircraft depot maintenance in North Island could be canceled.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

California will lose about $1.6 million in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

California will lose about $3.3 million in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 129,770 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 2,000 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In California around 15,810 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $1.1 million.

Public health

California will lose approximately $2.6 million in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, California will lose about $12.4 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 9,400 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the California State Department of Health Services will lose about $2 million resulting in around 49,300 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

California could lose up to $795,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 3,000 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

California would lose approximately $5.4 million in funds that provide meals for seniors.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Teachers and schools

The District of Columbia will lose approximately $533,000 in funding for primary and secondary education. In addition about 1,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 2 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, the District of Columbia will lose approximately $925,000 in funds for teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 500 fewer low income students in the District of Columbia would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 510 fewer students will get workstudy jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 200 children in the District of Columbia, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

The District of Columbia would lose about $1 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, the District of Columbia could lose another $64,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In the District of Columbia, approximately 13,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $111.3 million in total.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

The District of Columbia will lose about $80,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

The District of Columbia will lose about $174,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 5,460 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Vaccines for children

In the District of Columbia around 370 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $25,000.

Public health

The District of Columbia will lose approximately $57,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, the District of Columbia will lose about $330,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 500 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the District of Columbia Department of Health will lose about $324,000 resulting in around 8,100 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

The District of Columbia could lose up to $13,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 100 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

The District of Columbia would lose approximately $191,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

DELAWARE

Teachers and schools

Delaware will lose approximately $1.4 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 20 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 2,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 4 fewer schools would receive funding.In addition, Delaware will lose approximately $1.8 million in funds for about 20 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 150 fewer low income students in Delaware would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 50 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 100 children in Delaware, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Delaware would lose about $1.1 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Delaware could lose another $359,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Delaware, approximately 2,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $7.6 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $0.6 million in Delaware. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Delaware would be cut by about $1 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Delaware will lose about $83,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Delaware will lose about $86,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 3,230 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 100 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Delaware around 380 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $26,000.

Public health

Delaware will lose approximately $86,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Delaware will lose about $330,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 400 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Delaware Division of Public Health will lose about $70,000 resulting in around 1,800 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Delaware could lose up to $19,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 100 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Delaware would lose approximately $201,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

FLORIDA

Teachers and schools

Florida will lose approximately $54.5 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 750 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 95,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 130 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Florida will lose approximately $31.1 million in funds for about 380 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 6,250 fewer low income students in Florida would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 1,700 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 2,700 children in Florida, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Florida would lose about $5.2 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Florida could lose another $1.1 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Florida, approximately 31,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $183.2 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $7 million in Florida. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Florida would be cut by about $23 million. Navy: $135 million in funding for aircraft depot maintenance in Jacksonville and four demolition projects in Pensacola ($3.2 million) could be canceled.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Florida will lose about $970,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Florida will lose about $2.3 million in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 78,960 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 1,600 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Florida around 7,450 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $509,000.

Public health

Florida will lose approximately $1.8 million in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Florida will lose about $5 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 4500 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Florida State Department of Health will lose about $1.4 million resulting in around 35,900 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Florida could lose up to $404,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 1,500 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Florida would lose approximately $3.8 million in funds that provide meals for seniors.

GEORGIA

Teachers and schools

Georgia will lose approximately $28.6 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 390 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 54,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 80 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Georgia will lose approximately $17.5 million in funds for about 210 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 2,490 fewer low income students in Georgia would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 890 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,700 children in Georgia, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Georgia would lose about $3.5 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Georgia could lose another $979,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Georgia, approximately 37,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $190.1 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $233 million in Georgia. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Georgia would be cut by about $5 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Georgia will lose about $427,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Georgia will lose about $873,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 33,160 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 1,100 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Georgia around 4,180 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $286,000.

Public health

Georgia will lose approximately $925,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Georgia will lose about $2.5 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 2400 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And Georgia health departments will lose about $571,000 resulting in around 14,300 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Georgia could lose up to $208,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 800 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Georgia would lose approximately $1.3 million in funds that provide meals for seniors.

ILLINOIS

Teachers and schools

Illinois will lose approximately $33.4 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 460 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 39,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 120 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Illinois will lose approximately $24.7 million in funds for about 300 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 3,280 fewer low income students in Illinois would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 2,650 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 2,700 children in Illinois, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Illinois would lose about $6.4 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Illinois could lose another $974,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Illinois, approximately 14,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $83.5 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $19 million in Illinois. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Illinois would be cut by about $7 million. Navy: Four planned Naval Station Great Lakes demolition projects ($2 million) could be canceled and a scheduled Blue Angels show in Rockford could be canceled.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Illinois will lose about $587,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives

Job-search assistance

Illinois will lose about $1.4 million in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 50,780 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 1,100 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Illinois around 5,230 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $357,000.

Public health

Illinois will lose approximately $968,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Illinois will lose about $3.5 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 3,900 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Illinois State Department of Public Health will lose about $186,000 resulting in around 4,600 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Illinois could lose up to $273,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 1,000 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Illinois would lose approximately $764,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

KENTUCKY

Teachers and schools

Kentucky will lose approximately $11.8 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 160 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 21,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 40 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Kentucky will lose approximately $7.7 million in funds for about 90 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 1,710 fewer low income students in Kentucky would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 470 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,100 children in Kentucky, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Kentucky would lose about $2.1 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Kentucky could lose another $774,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Kentucky, approximately 11,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $54.4 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $122 million in Kentucky.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Kentucky will lose about $171,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Kentucky will lose about $478,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 16,690 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 500 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Kentucky around 1,350 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $92,000.

Public health

Kentucky will lose approximately $414,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Kentucky will lose about $1 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 1,200 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Kentucky State Cabinet of Health and Family Services will lose about $83,000 resulting in around 2,100 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Kentucky could lose up to $93,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 400 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Kentucky would lose approximately $677,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

LOUISIANA

Teachers and schools

Louisiana will lose approximately $15.8 in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 220 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 26,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 50 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Louisiana will lose approximately $9.8 million in funds for about 120 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 540 fewer low income students in Louisiana would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 110 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,400 children in Louisiana, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Louisiana would lose about $2.5 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Louisiana could lose another $884,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Louisiana, approximately 7,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $35.9 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $58 million in Louisiana. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Louisiana would be cut by about $8 million. Navy: A planned demolition project at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans and a scheduled Blue Angels show at Barksdale Air Force Base could be canceled.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Louisiana will lose about $264,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Louisiana will lose about $509,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 17,150 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 600 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Louisiana around 1,730 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $118,000.

Public health

Louisiana will lose approximately $433,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Louisiana will lose about $1.3 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 1,300 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Louisiana State Department of Health & Hospitals will lose about $320,000 resulting in around 8,000 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Louisiana could lose up to $97,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 400 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Louisiana would lose approximately $488,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

MARYLAND

Teachers and schools

Maryland will lose approximately $14.4 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 200 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 12,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 30 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Maryland will lose approximately $9.7 million in funds for about 120 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 770 fewer low income students in Maryland would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 440 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 800 children in Maryland, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Maryland would lose about $3.1 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Maryland could lose another $467,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Maryland, approximately 46,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $353.7 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $95 million in Maryland. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Maryland would be cut by about $10 million. Navy: $9 million in funding for a demolition project in Patuxent River and aircraft depot maintenance in Patuxent River could be canceled, as well as Blue Angels shows in Annapolis and Ocean City.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Maryland will lose about $317,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Maryland will lose about $66,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 9,270 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 400 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Maryland around 2,050 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $140,000.

Public health

Maryland will lose approximately $551,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Maryland will lose about $1.6 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 2,500 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And Maryland health departments will lose about $595,000 resulting in around 14,900 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Maryland could lose up to $124,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 500 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Maryland would lose approximately $877,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

MASSACHUSETTS

Teachers and schools

Massachusetts will lose approximately $13.9 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 190 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 20,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 60 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Massachusetts will lose approximately $13.4 million in funds for about 160 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 580 fewer low income students in Massachusetts would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 800 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,100 children in Massachusetts, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Massachusetts would lose about $4 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Massachusetts could lose another $472,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Massachusetts, approximately 7,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $43.4 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $8 million in Massachusetts. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Massachusetts would be cut by about $5 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Massachusetts will lose about $300,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Massachusetts will lose about $787,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 26,970 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 500 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Massachusetts around 2,940 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $201,000.

Public health

Massachusetts will lose approximately $625,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Massachusetts will lose about $1.7 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 5,200 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Massachusetts State Department of Public Health will lose about $367,000 resulting in around 9,200 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Massachusetts could lose up to $140,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 500 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Massachusetts would lose approximately $535,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

MICHIGAN

Teachers and schools

Michigan will lose approximately $22 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 300 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 25,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 80 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Michigan will lose approximately $20.3 million in funds for about 240 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 2,490 fewer low income students in Michigan would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 1,300 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 2,300 children in Michigan, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Michigan would lose about $5.9 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Michigan could lose another $1.5 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Michigan, approximately 10,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $67.7 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $14 million in Michigan.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Michigan will lose about $482,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Michigan will lose about $1.7 million in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 54,400 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 900 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Michigan around 4,400 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $301,000.

Public health

Michigan will lose approximately $944,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Michigan will lose about $2.9 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 3,500 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Michigan Department of Community Health will lose about $315,000 resulting in around 7,900 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Michigan could lose up to $209,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 800 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Michigan would lose approximately $1.8 million in funds that provide meals for seniors.

MISSISSIPPI

Teachers and schools

Mississippi will lose approximately $5,486,000 in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 80 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 12,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 20 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Mississippi will lose approximately $6,124,000 in funds for about 70 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 510 fewer low income students in Mississippi would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 150 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,600 children in Mississippi, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Mississippi would lose about $1,758,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Mississippi could lose another $606,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Mississippi, approximately 9,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $49.9 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $2.8 million in Mississippi. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Mississippi would be cut by about $4 million. Navy: Deferred procurement for ships, and a planned demolition project at Naval Air Station Meridian could be canceled.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Mississippi will lose about $138,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Mississippi will lose about $350,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 11,880 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 400 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Mississippi around 1,170 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $80,000.

Public health

Mississippi will lose approximately $283,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Mississippi will lose about $710,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 900 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Mississippi State Department of Health will lose about $141,000 resulting in around 3,500 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Mississippi could lose up to $63,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 200 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Mississippi would lose approximately $182,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

MISSOURI

Teachers and schools

Missouri will lose approximately $11.9 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 160 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 17,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 60 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Missouri will lose approximately $10.8 in funds for about 130 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 1,280 fewer low income students in Missouri would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 750 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,200 children in Missouri, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Missouri would lose about $3,745,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Missouri could lose another $1,184,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Missouri, approximately 8,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $40.3 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $56 million in Missouri. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Missouri would be cut by about $14 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Missouri will lose about $298,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Missouri will lose about $758,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 25,460 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 700 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Missouri around 2,500 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $171,000.

Public health

Missouri will lose approximately $572,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Missouri will lose about $1,300,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 3300 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Missouri State Department of Health & Senior Services will lose about $211,000 resulting in around 5,300 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Missouri could lose up to $127,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 500 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Missouri would lose approximately $419,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

NEW YORK

Teachers and schools

New York will lose approximately $42.7 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 590 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 70,000 fewer students would be served and approximately120 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, New York will lose approximately $36.3 million in funds for about 440 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 4,520 fewer low income students in New York would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 4,150 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 4,300 children in New York, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

New York would lose about $12,869,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, New York could lose another $1,201,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In New York, approximately 12,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $60.9 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $108 million in New York.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

New York will lose about $780,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

New York will lose about $884,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 46,230 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 2,300 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In New York around 7,170 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $490,000.

Public health

New York will lose approximately $1,070,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, New York will lose about $5,730,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 6,100 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And New York’s health departments will lose about $2,726,000 resulting in around 68,200 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

New York could lose up to $412,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 1,600 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

New York would lose approximately $1,447,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

NORTH CAROLINA

Teachers and schools

North Carolina will lose approximately $25.4 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 350 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 38,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 80 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, North Carolina will lose approximately $16.8 million in funds for about 200 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 1,150 fewer low income students in North Carolina would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 890 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,500 children in North Carolina, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

North Carolina would lose about $3,606,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, North Carolina could lose another $1,265,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In North Carolina, approximately 22,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $117.5 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $136 million in North Carolina. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in North Carolina would be cut by about $5 million. Navy: Cancel aircraft depot maintenance in Cherry Point, NC.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

North Carolina will lose about $401,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

North Carolina will lose about $83,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 15,110 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 1,300 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In North Carolina around 3,550 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $243,000.

Public health

North Carolina will lose approximately $911,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, North Carolina will lose about $1,980,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 3700 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the North Carolina Department of Health & Human Services will lose about $341,000 resulting in around 8,500 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

North Carolina could lose up to $205,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 800 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

North Carolina would lose approximately $1,543,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

OHIO

Teachers and schools

Ohio will lose approximately $25.1 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 350 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 34,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 100 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Ohio will lose approximately $22 million in funds for about 270 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 3,320 fewer low income students in Ohio would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 1,450 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 2,500 children in Ohio, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Ohio would lose about $6,865,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Ohio could lose another $981,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Ohio, approximately 26,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $161.4 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $1.9 million in Ohio. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Ohio would be cut by about $3 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Ohio will lose about $455,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Ohio will lose about $1,786,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 57,100 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 800 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Ohio around 5,040 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $344,000.

Public health

Ohio will lose approximately $1,102,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Ohio will lose about $3,310,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 4200 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Ohio State Department of Health will lose about $302,000 resulting in around 7,600 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Ohio could lose up to $245,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 900 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Ohio would lose approximately $823,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

OKLAHOMA

Teachers and schools

Oklahoma will lose approximately $4.9 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 70 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 13,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 40 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Oklahoma will lose approximately $7.3 million in funds for about 90 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 460 fewer low income students in Oklahoma would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 180 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 800 children in Oklahoma, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Oklahoma would lose about $1,655,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Oklahoma could lose another $998,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Oklahoma, approximately 24,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $123.9 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $48 million in Oklahoma. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Oklahoma would be cut by about $20 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Oklahoma will lose about $193,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Oklahoma will lose about $339,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 12,080 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 500 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Oklahoma around 1,490 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $102,000.

Public health

Oklahoma will lose approximately $358,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Oklahoma will lose about $880,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 800 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Oklahoma State Department of Health will lose about $98,000 resulting in around 2,400 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Oklahoma could lose up to $74,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 300 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Oklahoma would lose approximately $298,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

PENNSYLVANIA

Teachers and schools

Pennsylvania will lose approximately $26.4 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 360 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 29,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 90 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Pennsylvania will lose approximately $21.4 million in funds for about 260 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 3,160 fewer low income students in Pennsylvania would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 2,290 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 2,300 children in Pennsylvania, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Pennsylvania would lose about $5,705,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Pennsylvania could lose another $1,448,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Pennsylvania, approximately 26,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $150.1 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $7 million in Pennsylvania.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Pennsylvania will lose about $509,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Pennsylvania will lose about $866,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 36,860 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 1,800 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Pennsylvania around 5,280 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $361,000.

Public health

Pennsylvania will lose approximately $1,213,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Pennsylvania will lose about $2,930,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 3,500 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And Pennsylvania’s health departments will lose about $639,000 resulting in around16,000 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Pennsylvania could lose up to $271,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 1,000 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Pennsylvania would lose approximately $849,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Teachers and schools

South Carolina will lose approximately $12.5 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 170 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 15,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 30 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, South Carolina will lose approximately $8.6 million in funds for about 100 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 830 fewer low income students in South Carolina would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 270 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 900 children in South Carolina, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

South Carolina would lose about $1,763,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, South Carolina could lose another $646,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In South Carolina, approximately 11,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $59.5 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $62 million in South Carolina. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in South Carolina would be cut by about $19 million.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

South Carolina will lose about $278,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

South Carolina will lose about $550,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 18,780 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 300 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In South Carolina around 1,860 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $127,000.

Public health

South Carolina will lose approximately $442,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, South Carolina will lose about $1,020,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 1400 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the South Carolina State Department of Health and Environment will lose about $276,000 resulting in around 6,900 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

South Carolina could lose up to $99,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 400 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

South Carolina would lose approximately $791,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

TENNESSEE

Teachers and schools

Tennessee will lose approximately $14.8 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 200 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 32,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 60 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Tennessee will lose approximately $11.7 million in funds for about 140 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 1,660 fewer low income students in Tennessee would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 720 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,200 children in Tennessee, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Tennessee would lose about $2,211,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Tennessee could lose another $1,216,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Tennessee, approximately 7,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $36.9 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $1.9 million in Tennessee.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Tennessee will lose about $367,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Tennessee will lose about $681,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 24,050 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 800 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Tennessee around 2,590 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $177,000.

Public health

Tennessee will lose approximately $606,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Tennessee will lose about $1,480,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 700 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Tennessee State Department of Health will lose about $252,000 resulting in around 6,300 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Tennessee could lose up to $136,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 500 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Tennessee would lose approximately $1,031,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

TEXAS

Teachers and schools

Texas will lose approximately $67.8 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 930 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 172,000 fewer students would be served and approximately280 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Texas will lose approximately $51 million in funds for about 620 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 4,720 fewer low income students in Texas would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 1,450 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 4,800 children in Texas, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Texas would lose about $8,467,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Texas could lose another $2,235,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Texas, approximately 52,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $274.8 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $233 million in Texas. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Texas would be cut by about $27 million. Navy: Reduce procurement of the Joint Strike Fighter from Texas, and cancel scheduled Blue Angels shows in Corpus Christi and Fort Worth.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Texas will lose about $1,103,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Texas will lose about $2,263,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 83,750 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 2,300 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Texas around 9,730 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $665,000.

Public health

Texas will lose approximately $2,402,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Texas will lose about $6,750,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 2,800 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And Texas’ health departments will lose about $1,146,000 resulting in around 28,600 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Texas could lose up to $543,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 2,100 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Texas would lose approximately $3,557,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

VIRGINIA

Teachers and schools

Virginia will lose approximately $14 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 190 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 14,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 40 fewer schools would receive funding. In addition, Virginia will lose approximately $13.9 million in funds for about 170 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.

Work-study jobs

Around 2,120 fewer low income students in Virginia would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 840 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.

Head Start

Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,000 children in Virginia, reducing access to critical early education.

Funding for clean air and water

Virginia would lose about $2,997,000 in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Virginia could lose another $826,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

Military readiness

In Virginia, approximately 90,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $648.4 million in total. Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $146 million in Virginia. Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Virginia would be cut by about $8 million. Navy: Cancel the maintenance of 11 ships in Norfolk, defer four projects at Dahlgren, Oceana, and Norfolk, and delay other modernization and demolition projects.

Funds for law enforcement and public safety

Virginia will lose about $276,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Job-search assistance

Virginia will lose about $348,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 18,390 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Child care

Up to 400 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.

Vaccines for children

In Virginia around 3,530 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $241,000.

Public health

Virginia will lose approximately $764,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Virginia will lose about $2,140,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 1,700 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Virginia State Department of Health will lose about $337,000 resulting in around 8,400 fewer HIV tests.

STOP Violence Against Women Program

Virginia could lose up to $172,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 700 fewer victims being served.

Nutrition assistance for seniors

Virginia would lose approximately $1,215,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

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One response to “List of Sequester Cuts Per HBCU State

  1. Very descriptive post, I loved that a lot. Will there be a
    part 2?

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