The HBCU Money™ Weekly Market Watch

Our Money Matters /\ November 21, 2014

A weekly snapshot of African American owned public companies and HBCU Money™ tracked African stock exchanges.

NAME TICKER PRICE (GAIN/LOSS %)

African American Publicly Traded Companies

Citizens Bancshares Georgia (CZBS) $8.90 (0.00% UNCH)

M&F Bancorp (MFBP) $5.30 (0.00% UNCH)

Radio One (ROIA) $1.85 (7.56% UP)

African Stock Exchanges

Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM)  240.38 (0.29% UP)

Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE)  9 515.64 (0.31% UP)

Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE)  2 284.97 (6.52% UP)*

Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE)  162.06 (N/A)

Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) 50 855.09 (0.02% UP)

International Stock Exchanges

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) 11 004.00 (0.60% UP)

London Stock Exchange (LSE)  3 599.11 (0.98% UP)

Tokyo Stock Exchange (TOPIX)  1 400.18 (0.18% UP)

Commodities

Screen Shot 2014-11-21 at 12.39.23 PM

About these ads

Unemployment Rate By HBCU State – September 2014

Screen Shot 2014-11-18 at 1.35.05 PM

NUMBER OF STATES WITH RISING UNEMPLOYMENT: 4

NUMBER OF STATES WITH DECLINING UNEMPLOYMENT: 17

NUMBER OF STATES WITH UNCHANGED UNEMPLOYMENT: 3

LOWEST: OKLAHOMA – 4.7%

HIGHEST – GEORGIA – 7.9%

ALABAMA –  6.6% (6.9%)

ARKANSAS – 6.2% (6.3%)

CALIFORNIA – 7.3% (7.4%)

DELAWARE – 6.5% (6.5%)

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA – 7.7% (7.6%)

FLORIDA – 6.1% (6.3%)

GEORGIA – 7.9% (8.1%)

ILLINOIS – 6.6% (6.7%)

KENTUCKY – 6.7% (7.1%)

LOUISIANA – 6.0% (5.8%)

MARYLAND – 6.3% (6.4%)

MASSACHUSETTS – 6.0% (5.8%)

MICHIGAN – 7.2% (7.4%)

MISSISSIPPI – 7.7% (7.9%)

MISSOURI –  6.3% (6.3%)

NEW YORK – 6.2% (6.4%)

NORTH CAROLINA – 6.7% (6.8%)

OHIO – 5.6% (5.7%)

OKLAHOMA – 4.7% (4.7%)

PENNSYLVANIA – 5.7% (5.8%)

SOUTH CAROLINA – 6.6% (6.4%)

TENNESSEE – 7.3% (7.4%)

TEXAS – 5.2% (5.3%)

VIRGINIA – 5.5% (5.6%)

Previous month in parentheses.

HBCU Money™ Business Book Feature – Death in a Promised Land: The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921

483891

When a crows began to gather outside the jail in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on the evening of May 31, 1921., the fate of one of its prisoners, a young black male, seemed assured. Accused of attempting to rape a white woman, Dick Rowland was with little doubt about to be lynched.

But in another part of town, a small group of black men, many of them World War I veterans, decided to risk lives for a different vision of justice. Before it was all over, Tulsa had erupted into one of America’s worst racial nightmares, leaving scores dead and hundreds of homes and businesses destroyed.

Exhaustively researched, ‘Death in a Promised Land’ is compelling story of racial ideologies, southwestern politics, and yellow journalism, and of an embattled black community’s struggle to hold onto its land and freedom. More than just the chronicle of one of the nation’s most devastating race riots, this critically acclaimed study of American race relations is, above all, a gripping story of terror and lawlessness, and of courage, hedonism, and human perserverance.

HBCU Money™ Dozen 11/10 – 11/14

600px-i-12-svg

Did you miss HBCU Money™ Dozen via Twitter? No worry. We are now putting them on the site for you to visit at your leisure. We have made some changes here at HBCU Money™ Dozen. We are now solely focused on research and central bank articles from the previous week.

Research

Top 10 tech conspiracy theories of all time l Infoworld http://ow.ly/EdKYh

The race is on to get comet data before Philae dies l New Scientist http://ow.ly/EdLtZ

Dragging dark matter out of the shadows l New Scientist http://ow.ly/E7Qbe

Bees talk by dancing, and when sleep deprived their moves get super clumsy l Wired Science hwrd.cm/112ZWUM

Mastering the Business Basics of Online Reputation Management l CIOonline http://ow.ly/EdNj7

Room to grow: Tips for data center capacity planning l Computerworld http://ow.ly/EdR0E

Federal Reserve, Central Banks, & Financial Departments

Would we be better off without email? l World Economic Forum http://wef.ch/1wXj1nL

Teachers, see our lesson plan on financial preparedness in Katrinas classroom l Atlanta Fed http://goo.gl/IsGju4

78% of the world’s poor live in rural areas & work mainly in farming? l World Bank http://wrld.bg/EaBrI

How bank bonuses affect profits and risk l World Economic Forum http://wef.ch/1EyxwPb

President Dudley on U.S. Monetary Policy and its Global Implications l NY Fed http://nyfed.org/1wX1UCA

What demand, supply and the dollar have to do with the recent drop in oil prices l Blackrock bit.ly/1sJa4cs

Thank you as always for joining us on Saturday for HBCU Money™ Dozen. The 12 most important research and finance articles of the week.

The HBCU Money™ Weekly Market Watch

Our Money Matters /\ November 14, 2014

A weekly snapshot of African American owned public companies and HBCU Money™ tracked African stock exchanges.

NAME TICKER PRICE (GAIN/LOSS %)

African American Publicly Traded Companies

Citizens Bancshares Georgia (CZBS) $8.90 (0.00% UNCH)

M&F Bancorp (MFBP) $5.22 (0.00% UNCH)

Radio One (ROIA) $1.99 (0.51% UP)

African Stock Exchanges

Bourse Regionale des Valeurs Mobilieres (BRVM)  238.13 (3.46% UP)

Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE)  9 520.60 (0.06% DN)

Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE)  2 260.17 (5.36% UP)*

Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE)  163.70 (N/A)

Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) 50 598.02 (0.02% UP)

International Stock Exchanges

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) 10 874.65 (0.05% UP)

London Stock Exchange (LSE)  3 555.51 (0.25% UP)

Tokyo Stock Exchange (TOPIX)  1 400.41 (0.78% UP)

Commodities

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 2.22.54 PM

 

 

Afrovember™: A Look At A Few Vital African American Male Health Statistics

men_in_black_clip_art_20475

“To preserve health is a moral and religious duty, for health is the basis of all social virtues. We can no longer be useful when not well.” – Samuel Johnson

We decided to highlight a few vital statistics for 2014′s for this year’s Movember/No-Shave November and highlight Afrovember to show some of the statistics around African American’s men’s health:

  • African American male life expectancy is 71 years – WORST AMONG ALL GROUPS IN AMERICA.

  • The top 3 causes of death for African American males are heart disease, cancer, and unintentional injuries.

  • Percent of African American men 18 years and over who currently smoke cigarettes: 23.7%

  • Percent of African American men 20 years and over who are obese: 37.9%

  • Percent of African American men 20 years and over with hypertension: 39.9%

  • Birth rates for African American men declined 1% to 58.2 births per 1,000 men aged 15–54 — a new record low for the group.

Source: Center for Disease Control

Unfortunately, it appears that there is very little data being collected on African American men’s health. An opportunity certainly for an HBCU research center to be formed that focused in on the collection of such data. Given the reluctance especially among African American men to engage doctors (and with good historical reason) a measured approach and strategy to bringing in interaction could go a long way into finding ways to improve African American men’s health.

Check out just a few organizations contributing to the improvement of African American Male Health:

Black Men’s Health Summit

Project Brotherhood

Hampton University Men’s Health Initiative

African America’s October Jobs Report – 10.9%

jobs_pic

Overall Unemployment: 5.8% (5.9%)

African America Unemployment: 10.9% (11.0%)

Latino America Unemployment: 6.8% (6.9%)

European America Unemployment: 4.8% (5.1%)

Asian America Unemployment: 5.0% (4.3%)

Previous month in parentheses.

Analysis: The overall unemployment rate dropped 10 basis points. Three of the four groups saw declines in their unemployment rate led by the European American group with a drop of 30 basis points. Asian America had an increase of 70 basis points in their unemployment rate. African America continues to be the only group with double digit unemployment.

African American Male Unemployment: 10.7% (11.0%)

African American Female Unemployment: 9.4% (9.6%)

African American Teenage Unemployment: 32.6% (30.5%)

African American Male Participation: 67.7% (68.5%)

African American Female Participation: 61.4% (61.4%)

African American Teenage Participation: 29.0% (28.6%)

Previous month in parentheses.

Analysis: African American males saw their unemployment rate drop by 30 basis points, but their participation rate dropped by 80 basis points. African American females saw their unemployment rate drop by 20 basis points while their participation rate remained unchanged. African American teenagers saw a rise of 210 basis points in their unemployment rate, but did see an increase in their participation rate of 40 basis points.

CONCLUSION: The overall unemployed added 214 000 jobs in October. Another healthy number in job growth for the country as a whole and marks the 49th straight month of job gains. African America saw a pullback on their recent job growth with a decline of 41 000 jobs and two months of gains and two months of losses over the past five months. Despite the loss, employment remains at its second highest number over the past five months. The participation rate also remains at its second highest rate over the past five months. African American teenagers continue to be the group making strides with an increase in number of employed and participation rate. Job growth while staying positive continues to be plagued by stagnant wages and continued threat of deflation in the economy. The overall economy seems to be less fragile, but African America’s seems to be mired in its own recession with erratic patterns of job gains and losses month to month. African America’s labor force also dropped 77 000 showing a disturbing trend of many dropping out of the job search pool. At the current labor force, it would require 183 000 job gain in November for African America to drop its unemployment rate to 9.9 percent.